Magento fastest growing platform in Europe

Magento fastest growing e-commerce platform, Europe

Magento fastest growing platform in Europe

Magento, most used e-commerce platform by biggest companies in Europe / Magento logo and EU flag

Magento fastest growing platform in Europe

According to Magento Commerce, the content management system Magento is the fastest growing cross-platform in Europe.

It boasts an impressive 53 clients on the Internet Retailer’s list of the 500 biggest e-commerce companies in Europe, more than any other platform.

“That’s more than any other provider and more than double Demandware’s 26 and SAP Hybris’s 24 clients,” the company stated.

In a press release from early June, Magento announced that 31pc of mid to large companies use their software. Other figures show that it powers over 25pc of e-commerce sites on the Alexa top one million list.

CEO Mark Lavelle added, “our European customers are out-innovating their competitors in mobile, unique shopping experiences, and new digital commerce business models”. Magento users in Europe include Dyson, Frankfurt Airport, Lafuma, Missguided, Orsay and Poundland.

Magento 2

The release of Magento 2 eight months ago is attributed to its fast growth: totalling over 350,000 downloads with approximately 2,400 live sites running on it. The update introduced new products like Magento Enterprise Cloud Edition, Magento 2.1, Magento Order Management and a renewed Magento Marketplace.

Magento’s rise isn’t a surprise to some: the company has been steadily growing since last year.

Translation for Magento websites

Using the Magento platform?

We translate sites running on the Magento content management system into more than 70 languages. Bring your e-commerce store to the global marketplace. Contact our sales team today.

The STAR Team

Source: E-commerce News

Windows 10 and Transit NXT

Upgrading to Windows 10 and Transit NXT

Windows 10 and Transit NXT

Using Transit NXT and thinking of upgrading to Windows 10? Here’s what to do…

Upgrade to Windows 10, keep Transit NXT

When you upgrade your computer to Windows 10, please consider the following:

  • keep personal files and apps (selected by default)
  • keep personal files only
  • do nothing

During the upgrade process, Windows OS will display a window prompting you to choose what you want to keep.

It is absolutely necessary that you select “Keep personal files and apps” – already selected by default.

Otherwise Windows will remove your Transit NXT installation (and its activation and all other programs) from your computer, prior to installation.

Upgrade auf MS Windows 10

Beachten Sie Folgendes, wenn Sie ein Upgrade Ihres Computers auf Windows 10 durchführen:

Während des Upgrade-Prozesses, zeigt Windows ggf. ein Fenster an, in dem Sie auswählen sollen, was Sie beibehalten möchten.

  • Persönliche Dateien und Apps beibehalten (standardmäßig ausgewählt)
  • Nur persönliche Dateien beibehalten
  • Nichts

Es ist unbedingt notwendig, dass Sie die Einstellung “Persönliche Dateien und Apps beibehalten” ausgewählt lassen!

Anderenfalls entfernt Windows Ihre Transit NXT-Installation und Aktivierung (und alle anderen Programme) von Ihrem Computer, bevor Windows 10 installiert wird.

The STAR Team

Image: Windows logo, copyright of Microsoft

We are hiring, STAR Translation

Jobs in Translation, We’re Hiring

We are hiring, STAR Translation

We’re hiring at our Dublin office

As our global customers grow, we are expanding our team in Dublin.

We’re hiring for the following jobs:

  • Sales Jobs – Business Development – Translation Services
  • Sales Jobs – Software Sales – Translation Technology Sales
  • Freelance Translators (English to German : Technical Translation)
  • Freelance Translators (English to German : Marketing Translation)
  • Freelance Translators (English to French : Technical Translation)
  • Freelance Translators (English to French : Marketing Translation)

Check out all our jobs here.

The STAR Team

Eating carpet prohibited, by Justin Ross Lee

The hazards of machine translation

Eating carpet prohibited, by Justin Ross Lee, the hazards of machine translation
Eating carpet strictly prohibited – a sign of the hazards of machine translation / Image credit: Justin Ross Lee via BBC

The Hazards of Machine Translation and Beyond

The Jackie Chan bus stop, a restaurant called Translate Server Error, wife cake, children sandwiches, wide-boiled aircraft – they sound like comical lines at a stand-up show. But, in fact, they’re real-world examples of glaring mistakes and the hazards of machine translation.

For big firms, poorly translated text can have major consequences such as the risk of offending potential customers or losing business. Although we often hear promises of machine learning tech that will process language translation effortlessly and naturally, just as a real [human] translator would.

But when will such technology be available to businesses?

Skype and its real-time translation upset

Last January, Skype launched its real-time translation tool which instantaneous voice-to-voice translation in seven languages. However, it suffered heavy blows when users complained that it turned ordinary Mandarin words into obscenities. The glitch came to light during the shooting of a Skype commercial in China; apparently even the simple phrase ‘it’s nice to talk to you’ translated into offensive swear words.

Google Translate, the traditional approach

Translation tools like Google Translate have traditionally been built around phrase-based statistical machine translation. Machine translation works by analyzing a back catalogue of texts already translated, such as academic papers and glossaries.

The texts are analyzed in parallel – both original and target languages. Using statistical probabilities, it selects the most appropriate translation to the phrase submitted; the better the quality of the original language, the greater its effectiveness. But it’s prone to howlers, like the ones mentioned earlier. Often the translations sound mechanical and dull.

The End of Machine Translation?

Alan Parker, director of engineering language technology at Facebook, recently commented on statistical machine translation reaching “the end of its natural life”. It has been said that translation technology is on path towards artificial neural networks much like the neural pathways of the human brain.

These neural networks are structured similarly to the brain, using complex algorithms to select phrases appropriate to the translation. Astonishingly the sophisticated network can learn metaphors, idioms and the subtle meaning behind language. This will effectively transform language translation today – rather than direct literal translation, the neural network can translate the same meaning to a different culture avoiding any possible offense.

While Facebook and Google have reported that they will switch over to neural network translation this year, they have not publically announced specific dates.

Auto-translation, not perfect yet

Despite the two tech giants rolling out plans to use neural networks, there are still major hurdles to cross before we’re quite there yet. According to Professor Philipp Koehn: “there are very hard problems with semantics and knowledge representation that have to be solved first, and that we are not close to solving.” Professor Koehn hints at less explicit information in the source language such a gendered nouns and verbs in languages such as Portuguese, Italian and German. Prof. Koehn is a computer scientist and expert in translation technology at the University of Edinburgh.

‘Chinese doesn’t use plurals, verb tenses or pronouns as we do in English, which makes exact translation very difficult’, Prof. Koehn added.

The Hazards of Machine Translation Tech and the Future

Albeit, translation technology has come a long way and provides decent literal translations; there is the need for a tech that speaks the real language of the end user.

Machine translation technology is a handy tool, but don’t rely on it entirely.

The STAR Team

Source: BBC Business News

European parliament, English not official language after Brexit

English not an official language after Brexit

European parliament, English not official language after Brexit

European parliament hemicycle in Strasbourg / Image credit: Wikipedia

English not official language, MEP warns

According to a senior MEP, English will not be an official EU language after Brexit.

English could lose its status as an official language as apparently no other EU country has English listed as an official language.

Onced Britain leaves the EU, English will be stripped of its status warned Danuta Hübner. Hübner, an economist, is head of the European Parliament’s Constitutional Affairs Committee (AFCO).

There are 24 official languages in the EU; the UK identified English as it own official language while Ireland notified Irish and Malta notified Maltese. Both countries also list English as their second official language. However, when Ireland and Malta joined the EU English was already an official language. Therefore both nations opted to list their other official languages instead.

We have a regulation … where every EU country has the right to notify one official language. The Irish have notified Gaelic, and the Maltese have notified Maltese, so you have only the UK notifying English.

Even though English may be removed as an official language, “English is one of the working languages in the European institutions, Hübner commented, adding: “it’s actually the dominating language.” It’s one of the most frequently used by EU civil servants.

If they want to keep English as an official language, the remaining countries would have vote to keep its status unanimously, Hübner noted.

EU Regulations

However, an EU source explained that the regulations governing official languages are themselves subject to more than one translation.

A regulation from 1958 regarding the official languages of the EU, was originally written in French and does not clearly state whether a member country, i.e. Ireland or Malta, can have more than one official language.

Interpretations of the French wording of this body of text concludes that this might be possible, whereas the English version says otherwise.

The regulation states that “if a member state has more than one official language, the language to be used shall, at the request of such state, be governed by the general rules of its law.”

According to reports from the Wall Street Journal, ‘the Commission has already started using French and German more often in its external communications’, after the UK voted to leave the EU last Thursday.

The STAR Team

Source: Politico EU

Gaeltacht sign in An Ghaeltacht

English translations anger Gaeltacht

Gaeltacht sign in An Ghaeltacht

An Ghaeltacht sign in the region / Image credit: TCD

Gaeltacht community anger over names in English

In a 2015 annual report by the Irish Language Commissioner, the highest number of complaints under the new Eircode postal system related to the translation of place names in the Gaeltacht region.

Rónán Ó Domhnaill, head of the office of An Coimisnéir Teanga expressed that he was not surprised at the level of anger in the Gaeltacht communities. More than 70 complaints were noted in the report. All complaints related to the English translation of Irish names and addresses without any Irish version.

Conradh na Gaeilge, the Irish language group, stated that up to 50,000 household in the Gaeltacht area are affected by the new system and called on the department to amend it.

Rónán Ó Domhnaill also reported that the Department of Communications had ‘breached a statutory language obligation during the rollout of the postcodes – Eircode’.

Irish Proficiency

As of today’s report, there is a reluctance on behalf of certain government departments to identify jobs requiring a proficiency in the Irish language. Mr Ó Domhnaill stated on the ‘serious questions that arise on the State’s willingness to provide services of the same standard in both languages’.

Source: RTÉ News

The STAR Team

Enterprise Ireland, East Point Business Park

Exports up by 10%, Enterprise Ireland Companies

Enterprise Ireland exports up by 10%, East Point Business Park

Enterprise Ireland reports its companies’ exports up by 10% last year, East Point Business Park / Image credit: RTÉ

Exports up by 10% last year, Enterprise Ireland reports

Enterprise Ireland reported in its annual business review that its companies saw an increase in exports up by 10% last year – an all-time high of €20.6 billion.

Enterprise Ireland helps Irish companies export to international markets.

EI also noted that growth was seen in exports across all sectors and in most export markets.

Export Sectors

A 32% increase saw exports of internationally traded software to €1.8 billion; construction and consumers firms saw an increase in exports of 21%, a total of €2.8 billion.

Manufacturing companies reported growth by 11% showing a total of €3.4 billion and food exports grew by 3% reporting, a total of €10.6 billion.

The figures announced today show the strength and capabilities of Irish companies competing at a global level — Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor.

Exports to the USA and Canada grew by 27% to almost €3 billion, while those to the UK rose by 12% to €7.5 billion and Northern Ireland increased by 8% to €4.2 billion.

“The 2015 export figure of €20.6 billion demonstrates the scale of the success that Irish companies are seeing in terms of winning business at record levels internationally”, Julie Sinnamon, CEO of Enterprise Ireland remarked. 429 overseas presences were established, including 200 in high-growth markets.

The UK remains our largest export market, exports there have ‘fallen from 45% in 2005 to 37% in 2015’, the agency stated.

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor commented that ‘Irish companies continue to deliver for the Irish economy.’

The STAR Team

Source: RTÉ News

STAR Translation Services logo

New Languages Supported in Transit NXT Service Pack 9

Transit NXT Service Pack 9
Transit NXT Service Pack 9 ushers new languages to its arsenal

New Languages Supported in SP9

The new Transit NXT Service Pack 9 ushered in loads of new features.

As the localization industry grows, we grow along with it and enhance Transit NXT each time to suit the requirements of the industry.

One of the most important aspects of translation is being able to translate projects to and from one’s language; not just for the translator but the project manager too. SP9 packs loads of new languages in which you can now work. Gone are the days that you no longer have to depend on variants if your language was not supported; start working in one of the new languages now supported by Transit.

Eight Additional Languages

Transit supports eight additional languages and language variants. Furthermore, both Transit NXT and TermStar support more than 200 languages and cover all relevant markets in the target languages.

Asian languages: Tajik, Pashto and Dari (Persian); Maori (New Zealand); Spanish (USA) and International Spanish variants; and two other European languages are all the latest additions to Transit NXT SP9.

Language selection drop-down menu in Transit NXT
Screenshot of the source language [selection] drop-down menu in Transit.

New Asian Languages in SP9

Tajik (تاجیکی)
Tajik or Tajiki, also called Tajiki Persian is a variety of Persian spoken in Tajikistan and Uzbekistan.
Pashto (پښتو)
Pashto belongs to the south-eastern Iranian branch of Indo-Iranian languages spoken in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iran.
Dari (دری‎‎)
Dari (Persian) is the variety of the Persian language spoken in Afghanistan.

New European Languages in SP9

Breton
Breton (Breton: Breizh; French: Bretagne) is a Celtic language spoken in Brittany, France.
Corsican
Spoken in the islands of Corsica (France) and northern Sardinia (Italy), Corsican is a Romance language of the Italo-Dalmatian subfamily.

Introducing Maori for SP9

Maori
An Eastern Polynesian language spoken by the Māori people – the indigenous population of New Zealand – Māori is one of the official languages of New Zealand since 1987.

Spanish Worldwide

Spanish (USA)
One of the most widely spoken language has a number of variants – Spanish (USA) being one.
International Spanish
Use Spanish (International) for standardizing particular Spanish language projects.

The STAR Team

The Ultimate Language Quiz by STAR Translation

Take the Ultimate Language Quiz

The Ultimate Language Quiz

Test your knowledge of world languages. Answer these twelve, tricky language-related questions and let us know your score in the comments.

The STAR Team

Pikachu in Hong Kong

Pikachu rename angers Hong Kong

Pikachu in Hong Kong
Pikachu toys line the shelves – its worldwide success expands from video games to other merchandise

Pokémon Pikachu rename leads to protests

The release of two new Pokémon games by Japanese game-maker Nintendo has angered Hong Kong.

As it is around the world, Hong Kongers are very familiar with the tiny, chubby, yellow-furred electric mouse known to them as Bei-Ka-Ciu. But a move to unify the names of 151 Pokémon characters to Mandarin Chinese has upset fans and “localists” alike.

Pikachu’s new Cantonese pronunciation sounds like Bei-ka-jau – nothing like its original.

Regional Pride

The name change, which may seems trivial to some, is part of a bigger problem in Hong Kong as locals see it as the “mainlandization” in the current climate.

Nintendo’s decision to translate all game characters “ignores Hong Kong’s culture,” a spokesman from a Facebook group known as Petition to keep Regional Chinese Translations of Pokémon said. “There’s no respect for it.”

“We are aware of the reasons behind Nintendo’s translation, presumably to make it easier for purposes such as publicity, but the move ignores a lot of players. We hope the Hong Kong market can be taken seriously and treated sincerely.” Locals, fans and activists took to the streets at the Japanese consulate to protest because they believe Cantonese — along with culture and tradition in Hong Kong — is being supplanted by Mandarin.

Regional Language

Cantonese is spoken in Hong Kong, while Mandarin Chinese is the official tongue of Mainland China. The Chinese government sees Cantonese as one of the many dialects used throughout China; however, those protesting believe Cantonese is a proper language and on par with Mandarin.

A Cultural Icon

“Pikachu has been in Hong Kong for more than 20 years,” said Sing Leung, one of those who took part in the demonstration. “It is not simply a game or comic book, it is the collective memory of a generation.”

Chinese Variants

There are different variants of Chinese depending on region. We offer Chinese translation for all variants.

The STAR Team

Source: BBC World News