Friday the 13th

Friday the 13th — a little knowledge to quell the fear

Friday the 13th
Black cats are synonymous with superstitions on Friday the 13th / Pixabay

Friday the 13th, the unluckiest day

Today is Friday the 13th, one of the unluckiest days of the year in the Western world. The fear of the number 13 —triskaidekaphobia — goes back to Mediaeval times when the story of the Last Supper and crucifixion of Jesus Christ became commonplace among religious scholars.

Although Friday and the number 13 were both considered unlucky, the two together were never seen as extraordinarily unlucky by the superstitious.

It’s not quite known how the unlucky number 13 and Friday converged to become synonymous with fear and dread, but it wasn’t heard of before the nineteenth century. Paraskevidekatriaphobia, the fear of Friday the 13th may attribute its origin to Thomas W. Lawson’s popular novel Friday, The Thirteenth, published in 1907. In it, an unscrupulous broker takes advantage of the superstition to create a Wall Street panic on the day. Thanks Thomas!

Others have suggested that the unholy day has its origin in a list of disasters and catastrophes that have occurred. Below are some of the more memorable ones.

  • five Nazi bombs fell on Buckingham Palace during the Blitz that destroyed the palace chapel and killed one member of staff
  • on Friday the 13th, October 1972, twelve people died instantly during an aeroplane crash in the Andes mountain range and more were killed in an avalanche thereafter. The survivors resorted to cannibalism of the dead passengers in order to live. The crash was later turned into a movie, Alive!
  • on Friday the 13th, November 1970, in Bangladesh, a cyclone made landfall that killed at least 300,000 people
  • legendary rapper, Tupac Shakur died from gunshot wounds in Los Angeles

Many other horror stories have made headlines around the world that affirm our worst fears surrounding this day.

Albeit, in Italy, the number 13 is known to bring good fortune; it’s Friday the 17th when Italians are most superstitious. This phobia has its origins in the Roman numeral for 17: XVII; however, when shuffled they read VIXI, meaning ‘I have lived’; this implies that death is present.

Despite this old myth, young Italians have been Americanized by popular culture that they now regard Friday the 13th as equally dreadful.

Share your horror stories with us in the comments.

The STAR Team

pseudo translation process

Information meets machine for efficient bus repair

Information meets machine for efficient bus repair — Industry 4.0

Dynamic Maintenance and repair using GRIPS, example

Typically, maintenance and service plans are static and not optimized for individual products. This can lead to waste of scarce resources such as time, money and materials. Not so in GRIPs.

When maintenance plans, interval and material are managed in GRIPS, you can produce dynamic maintenance plans and servicing strategies. Maintenance plans created in GRIPS take into account variable such as time and usage intensity (e.g. for a vehicle, the mileage), since last service, quality of the consumable (e.g. oil and fuel quality) and operation conditions (usage profile). For example, a dynamic maintenance plan for a bus can vary greatly depending on how demanding the operational conditions are: touring cross-country being the least demanding while inter-urban service to arduous or city service being the most demanding on engines, brakes and the body.

GRIPS example on buses, information meets machine
The screenshot shows a maintenance planning front-end used by a GRIPS customer for buses / STAR Translation Imaging

Maintenance information is dynamically compiled for different contexts. A bus might come in to a service station for just two hours and an individualized maintenance plan needs to be produced combining all maintenance steps, which have high-quality priority for this vehicle; require similar skills and tools; and for which the material required are already in stock and do not have to be ordered.

The dynamic maintenance capabilities of GRIPS are revolutionizing how maintenance is done. Instead of a predefined static, rigid and expensive maintenance schedule, it is a product’s individual configuration, history and current context (the time the vehicle is available for maintenance, budget for maintenance, etc.) that determine which maintenance task will be performed.

Similar to dynamic maintenance, repair information can also be dynamically produced and individualized in GRIPS. For example, when performing multiple repair steps after an automobile accident, a service technician can combine repair steps which all require, as pre-work, the car to be put on the lift, or which all require a specific, expensive tool (like a diagnostics device), which is available only one in the service station and is therefor in high-demand. Dynamic maintenance and repair make an efficient use of scarce resources and increase customer satisfaction.

Dynamic Diagnostics

Similar to maintenance, most diagnostics and troubleshooting routines today are statically generated. Diagnostic trees produced by Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA) are defined by engineers or aftersales specialists, and do not take into consideration any contextual information like time, tools, shared preparation steps, etc., necessary to produce a more effective, relevant and individualized diagnostic procedure on demand. GRIPS manage fault codes, symptoms, causes, links to repairs and feedback from previous diagnostic sessions.

Unlike other content management systems, GRIPS also manages the links to a model of the product’s structural and functional breakdown, as well as the links between components in the two models (e.g. how hardware and software components are related to support different braking system functions: like normal braking, manual braking, assisted braking with ABS / ESPS, etc.) Those functional and structural models are then used to produce context sensitive and efficient diagnostic procedures. Moreover, feedback collected from many diagnostic sessions help to identify the most relevant diagnostic or troubleshooting strategy for an actual problem.

Read more about GRIPS Information Management.

The STAR Team

GRIPS for Industry 4.0

STAR to attend National Industry 4.0 Summit

GRIPS, National Industry 4.0 Summit
GRIPS: Global Read-time Information Processing System / STAR Translation Imaging and stock photo

National Industry 4.0 Summit in Mullingar

The National Industry 4.0 Summit kicks off on 28th April at the Mullingar Park Hotel with a great line-up of keynote speakers.

The central theme to this year’s summit is “to ensure your business is at the leading edge of competitiveness and to explore developments in Industry 4.0 in collaboration with global industry leaders and experts.” Those that typically attend such an event are Ireland’s CEOs, CTOs (i.e. Chief Technology Officers) and senior management from the manufacturing and services sectors. The event will take place in a state-of-the-art conference centre, and will run from 09:00 to 16:30.

Why we’ll be there

Our Director, Paul Quigley will attend the conference on behalf of STAR Translation. Paul will be there to promote STAR Group’s GRIPS (Global Real-time Information Processing System) platform, and answer any questions regarding translation and a multilingual environment. Learn more about GRIPS Information Management

What is Industry 4.0?

Industry 4.0 is a collective term embracing a number of data exchange, contemporary automation and manufacturing technologies. It’s also known as the fourth industrial revolution or Industrie 4.0; and was originally coined by the German government from a project to promote the computerization of manufacturing.

Paul Quigley, Director
Paul Quigley (Director) from STAR Translation will attend the conference

The STAR Team

Sources: Mullingar Chamber of Commerce, Business World News and Industry 4 Summit

Gold trophy

STAR awarded highest supplier classification, John Deere

Gold trophy, STAR awarded highest supplier classification
STAR awarded supplier classification / Stock photo

STAR awarded highest supplier classification – John Deere

John Deere awarded STAR the highest supplier classification status.

STAR AG in Ramsen, Switzerland has been awarded Partner classification status for 2015. This is John Deere’s acknowledgment of STAR’s outstanding quality of translation service and product delivery capability, and its commitment to continuous improvement in business processes.

We view this prestigious classification as a symbol for the shared success of many years of cooperation to date, and we also consider it an incentive to continue striving as partners to meet the challenges of the future.

John Deere

John Deere is an industry-leading provider of agricultural, construction, forestry and turf equipment and precision farming solutions. The John Deere Achieving Excellence (AE) award is processed regularly to assess its suppliers and continuously improve cooperation.

Partner classification, the highest of the four possible classifications in the AE process, is awarded only to John Deere’s best-of-the-best suppliers. As John Deere puts it, [Partner status is] “our classification for those suppliers who distinguish themselves by repeatedly accepting cooperation in light of a challenge”.

Since 2009, STAR AG with its global network of in-house specialists has been John Deere’s dependable PLM partner for global information management with sales and aftersales documentation, market-appropriate translation and localization and automated multi-channel publishing and feedback processes.

“We view this prestigious classification as a symbol for the shared success of many years of cooperation to date, and we also consider it an incentive to continue striving as partners to meet the challenges of the future”, remarked Josef Zibung, owner and CEO of STAR AG.

The STAR Team

Source: STAR AG Switzerland

1916 Remembrance Wall unveils misspelling in Irish

1916 Remembrance Wall Unveils Misspelling

Easter Rising Remembrance Wall Unveils Misspelling

The unveiling of the 1916 Easter Rising Remembrance Wall on Sunday 3rd of April commemorated those who lost their lives in the rebellion 100 years ago.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny attended and laid a wreath in honour of the dead. Almost 500 people died in the uprising, of which 268 were civilians caught up in the violence.

1916 Remembrance Wall unveils misspelling in Irish
Missplaced Fada / RollingNews.ie

What was surprising to many was the misspelling of the Irish translation of Easter Rising 1916, Eírí amach na Cásca should have read Éirí amach na Cásca. Conradh na Gaeilge said the mistake illustrates a laziness towards the Irish language, and can’t understand why those involved didn’t ensure that the Irish was as accurate and correct as the English spelling.

Furthermore, in a statement the day after, the Glasnevin Trust has said:

There is a misplaced fada in the spelling of the word “Éirí ” on the Necrology Wall unveiled yesterday at Glasnevin cemetery. It will be corrected immediately.

The STAR Team

Sources: The Journal and RTÉ News

MindReader for Outlook

STAR Groups Wins Award for MindReader

STAR Group wins award for MindReader
Award for MindReader for Outlook / STAR Translation Imaging

STAR Group Won IT Innovation Award for MindReader

Mindreader for Outlook awarded IT innovation Award at a digital conference for businesses in Germany, CeBIT 2016. The award was in the category ‘Office Management’. STAR Group was there to receive it.

MindReader

The plug-in supports Outlook users with text suggestions from previous emails and thus, eliminates the need for time-consuming sentence formulation.

MindReader for Outlook is specially suited to SMEs. Training is unnecessary as MindReader automatically, and continuously learns from sent emails. The jury who awarded the prize consisted of professors, IT-industry experts, researchers and journalists.

In the professional environment of technical writers, our ‘authoring memory’ tools are already well established – Josef Zibung, CEO of STAR Group.

With MindReader for Outlook, we now bring professional technology as a streamlined and simple solution to the office environment. This innovation benefits everyone who writes emails — practically everyone.

MindReader for Outlook is available as a standalone or corporate license. The standalone license can be purchased via the STAR Group shop.

Source: STAR Group

The STAR Team

STAR Group Donates Transit to Universities in Ho Chi Minh City

STAR Group Donates Transit NXT to Universities in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The STAR Group donates Transit to two universities in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. They will receive Transit NXT as part of their CAT software tools; the University of Social Sciences and Humanities and Hoa Sen University.

Josef Zibung, president of the STAR Group in Ramsen, Switzerland paid visit to Ho Chi Minh City to present the STAR Transit NXT suite.

Since STAR also operates in Vietnam, they will be providing full support to the faculties involved in implementing training and use of Transit to students.

We provide Vietnamese translation of websites, brochures and documents to all our customers.

The STAR Team

Coleslaw and dips, Irish

9 Irish Language Translations, so bad they’re good

9 Hilarious Irish Language Translations

The Irish language is beautiful, but it also finds itself playing catch up with the modern world. So much so that it becomes blatantly obvious with some of these Irish language translations.

We found nine particularly unimaginative translations making their rounds on the Internet. These are too good to miss.

1

Coleslaw, Irish

Very creative.

2

Coleslaw and dips, Irish language translations

Feeling fluent already.

3

This is truly exceptional.

4

Hipster, Irish

The direct approach!

5

Mblíp!

6

Laser, Irish

L.A.S.E.R: light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.

L.É.A.S.A.R: Hmm.

7

Spaghetti, Irish

Keeping it simple.

8

Nua technolaíocht. Wonder what that could mean?

9

Wouldn’t have guessed!

The STAR Team

Source: The Journal

IEDR, Irish Web addresses showing fadas

Web Addresses showing Fadas to Become Reality

IEDR, Irish Web addresses showing fadas
Ireland’s Domain Registry / IEDR website

Irish Registry Domain to make Web Addresses showing Fadas a reality

Organizations and businesses in Ireland will very soon be able to register Irish Web addresses with fadas. This will change will enable Irish businesses using the .ie domain to also include any fadas contained in their names. Effectively, we will see Irish websites’ URLs with the fada included. That is, if their domain is an Irish name or word.

The fada is the acute accent or diacritic above all Irish vowels: á, é, í, ó and ú.

Recently, the IE Domain Registry, responsible for the administration of Ireland’s official Internet address .ie, has begun a consultation process to allow users to share their views about how the system should operate.

The registry will launch details of how people can register the fada domain names after the 21st of March.

We will be on the lookout for any domains using their fadas.

Read our article on 49 Reasons the Fada is Important in Irish

Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation

Sources: IEDR and The Journal.ie

Mount Elbrus, The Caucasus region

10 Oldest Languages Still Spoken Today

Mount Elbrus, The Caucasus region, 10 oldest languages still spoken today

Mount Elbrus, Europe’s highest mountain in the Caucasus region between Europe and Asia. A region known for its linguistic diversity / Wikipedia

10 Oldest Languages in Use Today

It is almost impossible to judge how old one language is from another. The evolution of language is virtually similar to biological evolution; like evolution, changes to a language happen minutely over the course of generations. However, there is no clearly discernible difference between one language and the next language, from which a language derived.

Despite this, each of the ten languages listed are considerably ancient yet still spoken today. Each with an intriguing history that differentiates it from a multitude of others.

Those 10 Ancient Languages

Hebrew
The Hebrew language is an interesting case on this list: it fell out of common usage circa 400 CE. Yet it remained preserved as a liturgical language for Jews around the world. The rise of Zionism in the 19th and 20th centuries revived the language until it became the official language of Israel. Hebrew speakers can fully understand the Old Testament in its original writings.
Tamil
Spoken by circa 78 million people, Tamil is officially recognized as a language of India, Sri Lanka and Singapore. This classical language has survived the ages. Dating back to the third century BCE, and still in continuous use today.
Lithuanian
Lithuanian, like most European languages, is Indo-European in origin. This group divided up c.3500 BCE. The most fascinating feature of Lithuanian is that it retained the sounds and grammar of its Proto-Indo-European ancestor, unlike that of its cousins.
Farsi
Mainly spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, Farsi is actually Persian, a direct descendant of Old Persian. Modern Persian first appeared circa 800 CE. Farsi speakers could quite easily read ancient texts in Persian with relative ease, more fluently than English speakers can read Shakespeare!

Ones you wouldn’t consider ancient

Icelandic
The Scandinavian language Icelandic is an Indo-European language from the North Germanic branch. This ancient language of the Norse peoples developed quite conservatively over the centuries. Amazingly, Icelanders can read their ancient sagas as if they were written yesterday.
Macedonian
This Slavic language belongs to the same family as Russian, Polish, Czech and Croatian. The Slavic language family is relatively young as far as languages are concerned and only split from Proto-Slavic, pre-ninth century CE.
Basque
The Basque language is a linguistic mystery. Spoken in regions that stretch across both France and Spain; it’s also unrelated to the Romance language family. The only explanation to explain it thus far, is that it existed long before the Romans arrived with the Latin they had spoken that subsequently developed into French and Spanish.
Finnish
The Finnish language is a member of the Finno-Ugric family which includes Estonian, Hungarian and several languages in minority groups across Siberia. Written down in the 16th century, its history is long. Interestingly, Finnish has many loanwords still in usage from Old Germanic and Gothic (those two languages do not exist today).
Georgian
Georgian is spoken in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, originating from the Caucasus region, the frontier between Europe and Asia. It’s part of the Kartvelian language family and unlike any other in the world. Although its alphabet is thought to be adapted from Aramaic.

Last but not least

Irish Gaelic
A minority of people in Ireland speak Irish (Gaeilge) today, but its history is long and artistic. A member of the Celtic branch of Indo-European languages, it existed long before the Germanic influences of Norse, Anglo-Saxon and Frisian landed on the British Isles. Scottish Gaelic and Manx derived from Irish Gaelic through migration. With the oldest vernacular of any language in Western Europe, the ancient Irish chose to write their manuscripts in Gaelic rather than the common Latin, at that time.
Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation

Source: The Culture Trip