Jun 27 2014

Homonyms: We Found This Humerus!

Homonyms: prevent shampooing your hare

Washing my hare !

Homonyms Galore.

The English language is bursting with homonyms: words that are spelled and pronounced the same way but have different meanings. It can get a tad confusing at times if you’re new to English [as a foreign language], but it usually helps when one understands the context the homonym is in to differentiate it. Trying to think of a homonym on the spot can be frustrating.

Here’s a few to get you started…

Patient: A doctor likes to have a patient patient.

Crisp: I like to eat a crisp crisp!.

Polish: I use Polish polish for my shoes.

Mass: The pope said mass to a lot mass of people yesterday. It was a mass mass.

Not just a homonym but rather, a capitonym!

You have probably come across this one before: telling the difference between Polish and polish. I’ve seen many ads in newspapers and magazines use it as a punchline. Although it’s only comical when it’s written or typed out. If you were to pronounce the two words [...] the difference is clear. We’re here to talk about homonyms but Polish / polish isn’t a true homonym. Rather, it is a capitonym. That is, a word that shares the same spelling but has a different meaning when it’s capitalised. March / march is another popular capitonym.

Here are some that’ll refresh your memory (as we’re sure your know many more):

  • change
  • book
  • match
  • cool
  • duck
  • block
  • light

These words are known to be true homonyms as they share the exact same spelling and pronunciation, and their meanings differentiate regardless of capitalisation.

Then there’s bark.

Bark (the skin of a tree) and bark (the sound a dog makes) are both homonyms  (same but different meanings), homophones (sound alike) and homographs (spelled the same). Unlike rain and reign which are known as just homophones, not homonyms. It helps if you take the combining form -phone in homophone, meaning sound or voice in Greek. While the combining form -graph in homograph means written or in writing.

Some familiar homophones are

  • sail / sale
  • flee / flea
  • be / bee
  • bear / bare
  • know / no
  • buy / by
  • toe / tow

Wait! There’s more.

What about those kind of words that are spelled the same way but have a different pronunciation and meaning? Think of bass (meaning both a fish and denoting a sound with a low pitch)? Or how about desert (to abandon or an arid region)?

We call these guys heteronyms or heterophones. We’ve put together a list of common heteronyms for you to have some fun with:

  • dove (A dove flew past my window) – (I dove into the sea)

Can you work out the rest?

  • ellipses
  • sake
  • resign
  • read
  • putting
  • present
  • record
  • wind
  • row
  • bow

Can you guess the meanings of each of them? We’ll leave the pronunciation to you.

Remember to leave a comment in the comment box below if you know any more homonyms.

^The STAR Team

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Jun 20 2014

Job Opening: German Project Manager

Published by Star Translation under Jobs,Languages,STAR

Job Opening

Translation Project Manager – German

STAR Translation is currently expanding our Dublin office and is looking to hire a number of translation project managers for our production team.

If you have a passion for translation and want to work for one of the worlds largest translation companies we’d love to talk to you.

For this role we are seeking a German speaking project manager.

This is a full time position.

Salary : €22,000 per annum

Responsibilities

  • Project Management

+ Analyse and prepare files for translation

+ Prepare word counts, budgets and translation schedules

+ Create and send out translation kits to the translation teams

+ Keep the project management database updated and keep track of budgets and deadlines

+ Receive and review translations

+ DTP work on final files and final QA checks

+ Additional administrative tasks may be required
You will be mainly working with our teams within the STAR network. Our project management team in Dublin deals with a large number of file formats and languages. Handling many projects simultaneously, you will be responsible for coordinating their translation and the DTP component.

  • Client Relationship Management

Working directly with clients you will be responsible for the smooth and efficient progression of projects by liaising with the different translation teams and the clients, respectively. You will establish strong working relationships with new and existing customers. STAR prides itself on its long term relationships with clients.

Requirements

  • Excellent spoken and written German ideally, where German is the first language
  • Candidates should have strong organizational skills, ability to multi-task, prioritise and work well under pressure — a strong focus on quality is expected
  • Excellent written and spoken English is required as well as excellent communication skills
  • Ability to integrate into an international work environment and work as part of a team
  • Excellent command of standard Office tools such as Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint and Word
  • A good knowledge of Adobe ® Creative Suite® would be a plus
  • Knowledge of CAT-tools
  • Degree level qualification in translation
  • Experience working in a translation company

Email CV’s to :

Contact: Damian Scattergood, Managing Director
Email: damian.scattergood (at) star-ts.com

or

Phone: 01 836 5614

About STAR Translation Services Dublin

Our Dublin centre is based in the Docklands Innovation Park in Dublin 3, close to the O2 arena. STAR is a provider of translation services in 40 languages. Founded in 2002, STAR TS is a member of the STAR Group. We are Europe’s largest privately held translation company with a network of over 40 offices around the world. Our project management team in Dublin works directly with clients and our different country offices on varied types of translation projects.

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Jun 19 2014

Job Opening: French Project Manager

Job Opening

Translation Project Manager – French

STAR Translation is currently expanding our Dublin office and is looking to hire a number of translation project managers for our production team.

If you have a passion for translation and want to work for one of the worlds largest translation companies we’d love to talk to you.

For this role we are seeking a French speaking project manager.

This is a full time position.

Salary : €22,000 per annum

Responsibilities

  • Project Management

+ Analyse and prepare files for translation

+ Prepare word counts, budgets and translation schedules

+ Create and send out translation kits to the translation teams

+ Keep the project management database updated and keep track of budgets and deadlines

+ Receive and review translations

+ DTP work on final files and final QA checks

+ Additional administrative tasks may be required
You will be mainly working with our teams within the STAR network. Our project management team in Dublin deals with a large number of file formats and languages. Handling many projects simultaneously, you will be responsible for coordinating their translation and the DTP component.

  • Client Relationship Management

Working directly with clients you will be responsible for the smooth and efficient progression of projects by liaising with the different translation teams and the clients, respectively. You will establish strong working relationships with new and existing customers. STAR prides itself on its long term relationships with clients.

Requirements

  • Excellent spoken and written French ideally, where French is the first language
  • Candidates should have strong organizational skills, ability to multi-task, prioritise and work well under pressure — a strong focus on quality is expected
  • Excellent written and spoken English is required as well as excellent communication skills
  • Ability to integrate into an international work environment and work as part of a team
  • Excellent command of standard Office tools such as Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint and Word
  • A good knowledge of Adobe ® Creative Suite® would be a plus
  • Knowledge of CAT-tools
  • Degree level qualification in translation
  • Experience working in a translation company

Email CV’s to :

Contact: Damian Scattergood, Managing Director
Email:  damian.scattergood (at) star-ts.com

or

Phone:  01 836 5614

About STAR Translation Services Dublin

Our Dublin centre is based in the Docklands Innovation Park in Dublin 3, close to the O2 arena. STAR is a provider of translation services in 40 languages. Founded in 2002, STAR TS is a member of the STAR Group. We are Europe’s largest privately held translation company with a network of over 40 offices around the world. Our project management team in Dublin works directly with clients and our different country offices on varied types of translation projects.

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Jun 17 2014

Most World Cup Wins

Published by Star Translation under Quiz,STAR

FIFA: For the good of the game, 1977

FIFA World Cup logo from 1977

Have you had football on the brain for the last few weeks?
If so, here’s some trivia for you…

The World Cup has been called many names: the World Cup, World Cup finals, the Cup and so on. Its official title is the FIFA World Cup and it is an international association football competition. In case you weren’t so sure, the sport is contested by the senior men’s national football teams and its governing body: FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Played every four years since its inaugural tournament in 1930 in Uruguay, except during 1942 and 1946 because of the Second World War, the World Cup has become the most viewed and followed sport in history and continues to do so.

FIFA’s early days began in 1904 when the body made efforts to establish an international football competition between nations outside of the Olympic framework. It was listed a failure. The British FA or Football Association organized for football to become an official game at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. It was a success and the following Summer Olympics (1912) in Sweden saw football return. The England team won on both accounts. In 1909, an international football tournament was organized by Sir Thomas Lipton (a merchant and the founder of Lipton Tea!) in Turin, Italy for professional club sides from Italy, Germany and Switzerland. Apparently the FA of England chose not to partake in the tournament. This event is known as The First World Cup. Having the first ever World Cup and football being played in the Summer Olympics, it wasn’t until 1914 that FIFA recognized it as a “world football championship for amateurs” and agreed to take responsibility for managing the event thereafter.

Current Format:

Its current format allows 32 international teams to take part in the finals. Since teams have to pass the qualification phase in the preceding three years, the tournament boasts high competitive stakes. In the past, FIFA started out with only a dozen or more teams per tournament. The 1950 games saw as little as 13 teams involved when it was held in Brazil for the first time. Its expansion resulted in 24 teams partaking back in 1982 and rose again to 32 teams in 1998. Although there has been talk of FIFA expanding the number of competing teams to 40.

For our football and World Cup fans out there, let’s jog your memory…

Who has won the World Cup most often?

COUNTRY WINNING TITLES
Brazil 5 (1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002)
Italy 4 (1934, 1938, 1982, 2006)
Germany 3 (1954, 1974, 1990)
Argentina 2 (1978, 1986)
Uruguay 2 (1930, 1950)
France 1 (1998)
England 1 (1966)
Spain 1 (2010)

The STAR Team

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Jun 10 2014

FIFA World Cup 2014: The Origins of Football

FIFA World Cup 2014, Brasil

Are you ready for the World Cup 2014 in Brazil!

One game grabs the attention of hundreds of millions of people around the world. Its objectives are simple yet engaging! We tackle the origins of association football and others alike, to get you into the spirit of the World Cup 2014 in Brazil.

Football has its origins in the unlikeliest of places around the world. The ancient Greeks played a ball game called ‘Episkyros’ (circa 388 to 311 BC) which is recognised as an early form of football by FIFA. While the Romans played a similar game adapted from the Greek ‘Episkyros’ called ‘Harpastum’. Both of these games allowed players to use both their hands and feet. The Romans played it with a small, hard air-filled ball; it was a violent sport. Game rules have not survived to this day. Some accounts have recorded that it was played with two teams, each consisted of about 12 to 14 players.

The ancient Chinese ball game, Cuju, is the earliest form of football for which there is scientific evidence, as recognised by FIFA. The game has records dating back from the 3rd century to the 1st century BC. Eventually rules were established allowing the games to become standardised. Cuju, literally meaning “kicking ball” quickly spread throughout China and into Japan and Korea at later periods. During the Asuka period in Japan (538 to 710 AD), a game called ‘Kemari’, a variation of the Chinese Cuju, was played.

Games similar to this modern form of football have appeared the world over and yet, each with similar rules and objectives. Some may extend as far back as before the ages of antiquity, but with little or no evidence of such. Just vague accounts of games among military men involving a ball. Their very nature as ancient ball games mean they bear little influence on modern football rules played at the World Cup. During the middle ages, there was a rise in the growth and popularity of football games involving parishes and local communities. Most of which took place in England. One festival details an annual sport called Shrovetide football. Other games of similar leisure were played at Christmastime and Easter. In Mediaeval Europe, “mob football” was popular among towns and villages. These games, played by local townsfolk, saw unlimited players of opposing teams clash as they kicked around an inflated animal’s bladder or a leather ball. One such account of what was possibly an early form of football comes from Ulgham, Northumberland in England in 1280. Mob football became a menace to early English society from the 13th to the 15th centuries, which resulted in the Fooball Act 1424, prohibiting any football being played in public. Despite its enforcement, the law fell into disuse and wasn’t repealed until 1906. There is much evidence of schoolboys playing football across the British Isles from the 1500s to the 1800s.

Many well-known English gentry were advocates of “footeball”. One man, Richard Mulcaster, who had been a student at the prestigious and famous Eton College during the early 16th century, was an advocate of the sport. His wide contributions took football from its violent forms of street play to organised teams. Muclaster standardised the beautiful game. The later half of the 16th century through to the early 17th century saw public schoolboys partake in recreational football games. Children were once part of the workforce in Britain during this time; they had spent what free time they had organising football games with formal codes of rules. It was these foundations that gave rise to modern football and association football alike.

As rules progressed, organisations and clubs were established in many parts of Britain. One club was the first documented to bear the title of football, “The Foot-ball Club”, located in Edinburgh, Scotland. It ran from 1824 to 1841. The club’s rules forbade the intentional act of tripping, but allowed pushing and the kicking and handling of the ball. There were similar football-like games being played in Ireland in the 1800s. It wasn’t until 1884 with the establishment of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) that any serious attempts to code and unify the sport were made. Another football sport arose during the early 19th century: Rugby. The sport of Rugby derived from football. Elite clubs sought to unify football thus, creating unique rules of play for well educate young men. In 1871, 21 Rugby clubs came together from around London and set up the Rugby Football Union (RFU) with the intent of unifying the sport’s practice and code.

The origin of the word football is inconclusive. The word itself references the action of a foot kicking a ball. It was widely played in Mediaeval Europe and had varying forms of play without formal rules. The act of kicking a ball by foot as a sport was popular around the world; this can account for football’s popularity as such cultures with a history of a similar game can relate to its modern cousin. Nowadays, depending on the country you are in, it can be an entirely different game. For instance, Americans call what we call American football, football! American football allows players to handle and kick the ball. In Canada and some parts of Europe and Asia, association football is known as “soccer”. Soccer is a shortening of “assoc” (association) plus “-er”.

The FIFA World Cup 2014 will commence on Thursday 12th June, at 21:00 with Brazil Vs. Croatia. You can catch the entire line up on the official website for the FIFA World Cup 2014. Did you know that the official language in Brazil is Portuguese! Vamos!

The STAR Team

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Jun 06 2014

Current Trends and Strategies for Technology M & A

Published by Star Translation under Business

Damian Scattergood, Managing Director of STAR Translation at Google EMEA

Recently we had the good fortune of being invited to the Google EMEA offices in Barrow Street, Dublin to hear from Pagemill Partners on exit strategies, the investment bankers on current trends in technology M & A (mergers and acquisitions).

Charles Welch and Matt Sasche, Pagemill’s managing directors, shared their experience of M & A activity both in the Valley and in Europe over the last few years.

Interestingly, they mentioned that while the media papers report big M & A activity such as Facebook et cetera, the majority of mergers and acquisitions (some 80% plus) isn’t public. We only hear about the big deals.

M & A activity is still very strong in the US and continues to grow. Since the beginning of 2007, 92% of M & A transactions have occurred between €10M and €500M.

Interest software and services and application software currently make up over 50% of M & A transactions and 75% of private investments worldwide. This is good news for a lot of Irish startup technology firms.

European equity investment is still very steady compared to US investment. Over the last 3 years, companies backed by the European VA have closed approximately €21B in equity investments. Early stage investments in Europe continue to be strong.

Exit Strategies:

In terms of developing an exit strategy – companies need to consider a number of factors.

What motivates the acquirers?

-Higher stock price
-Top-line growth
-Users
-Penetration into new markets
-New technology / Fill product gaps

-Margin improvement

-Enable cross-selling / Customer synergies

- IP Patents

-Enhance technical team.

What do sellers want and need?

-See developed technology succeed in market.

-Liquidity in a high value exit

-Established brand

-Greater financial resources

-Sales and marketing infrastructure and scale

-Broader product portfolio

How do people value companies?

Traditionally, there are a number of core factors that drive M & A valuations:

-Participation in a large thriving market.

-Ability to articulate synergies

-Providing business visibility

-Disruptive technology (relevant to the market today)

-Proper IP protection

-Strong financial position

-Execution of an effective M & A process at the optimal time!


M & A Advice:

Charles continued to give specific advice to Irish hi-tech startup companies on M & A (mergers and acquisitions).
A key element is to maintain and leverage local relationships and get on the “Silicon Valley radar” early.

A number of the major internet players are based here in Ireland: Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Dropbox, Amazon and eBay. Therefore you should start working on relationships with them now. They are local. This makes them easy to contact and start building contacts with. “It is useful to place Silicon Valley into your plan. Having an office there also helps”,  Charles stated. It’s important for investors to be able to engage with you. Having an office that’s located in close proximity to theirs allows them to see you in action. If you happen to have a small team in the US, that can really help a lot. It also shows commitment to the market.

Partnership:

An easy way to start building a relationship is through partnering; a number of big M & A deals happened as a result of this process over the last few years. It allows a partner to try before they buy. If the company sees the deal working they are more likely to invest heavily in it to make it happen and for it to grow faster. Remember, they are after scale.

Charles also warned tech start ups to be wary of the “I want to be bought and not sold” mantra.

Many technology acquirers are more reactive than proactive. Whilst they have a shopping list of targets to acquire, nothing happens without some form of external catalyst (i.e. the partnering business getting involved). Be proactive, to kickstart deals. Taking a proactive approach can increase the value of your deal.

Charles is the managing director of Pagemill Partners. They are investment bankers that specialise in mergers and acquisitions. If you want to contact him to learn more about Pagemill Partners, or want to sell your hi-tech company, he can be reached at the following details.

Pagemill Partners:

1950 University Avenue, Suite 400

East Palo Alto, California 94303

United States

Phone: +1 650 354 0000

www.pmib.com

The STAR Team

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May 28 2014

Criminal Lawyers


Do you know any criminal, criminal lawyers?

No. The above isn’t a typo.

Something I love about the English language is how pronunciation can change the context and meaning of a sentence. Last night I was watching Breaking Bad on DVD and caught a great line from Jesse Pinkman, one the protagonists in the series. When discussing lawyers, he turns to Walter White and says, “if you need a criminal lawyer, you should hire a CRIMINAL Lawyer – to make sure you get off”. Smart sentence… difficult to translate into other languages and keep the same humour and meaning because of its context.

Context is so important in the English language and especially in translation. It’s one of the most difficult challenges for translators.

Have you ever come across any similar play on words?

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May 21 2014

And the nominees are…

Top Language Lovers 2014 competition

STAR Dublin has been recently nominated in two categories as part of the ‘Top 100 Language Lovers 2014′ competition. A competition hosted by the bab.la language portal and the Lexiophiles Language blog. We have been nominated for similar awards in the past. Nonetheless, we are thrilled to be nominated as always.

The first category is Language Professionals’ Blogs where we have been placed among thousands of participants. The second category in which we have also been nominated is Language Twitter account. This year’s [competition] is the seventh edition. The voting has already begun and you can cast your votes now.

We won’t get upset if you don’t vote for us!

Bab.la & Lexiophiles are looking for the best 100 language lovers; there are a total of five categories. They are:

  • Language learning blogs
  • Language professionals’ blogs
  • Language Twitter accounts
  • Language Facebook pages
  • Language YouTube channels

Out of these five social media categories, everybody can vote for their chosen “language lovers”. The voting phase starts from the 20th of May through the 9th of June 2014. Once all votes have been cast, the final tally consists of Lexiophiles’ ranking criteria (50%) and users’ votes (50%). The winners will be announced on the 12th of June 2014.

Voting is simple. Use the buttons below to direct you to the polls in either category.

Vote the Top 100 Language Professional Blogs 2014

Vote for us in the Language professionals’ blog category!

Vote the Top 100 Language Twitterer 2014

Vote for us in the Language Twitter account category!

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May 13 2014

Meet Us At Localization World Dublin 4-6 June 2014

STAR Welcomes LocalizationWorld To Dublin

Join STAR at Localization World Dublin to learn about the latest trends and technology in the translation and localization business.

The conference will be held at the Convention Centre Dublin in Spencer Dock.

The Convention Centre Dublin (The CCD) is Ireland’s newly opened world class purpose-built international conference and event venue. Completed in 2010, it is now recognized as one of the top four convention venues in the world. Its an amazing place to do business.

Localization World is the premier industry event for translation and localization professionals worldwide. The Dublin event is in STAR’s home town, less than 1 kilometer from our Dublin office.

STAR is one of the world leaders in Translation Services and Multilingual Information Technology.  We’re the developers of Transit NXT the translation memory system and translation supplier to many global brands.

Learn more about:

  • CLM – STAR Corporate Language Management Solutions
  • Website Translation
  • Translation Workflow
  • Cloud Translation
  • Transit NXT – Translation Memory
  • GRIPS – Multilingual Content Authoring and Information Management

If you’re coming to Dublin for the expo, drop in and say “Hello” to our team:
We’re on STAND 42.

Conference Contacts:

Damian Scattergood
Managing Director

STAR Dublin

Phone: +353 1 8365614

email: Damian.Scattergood (at) star-ts.com

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May 12 2014

STAR Translation Meets STAR Wars

Warwick Davis meeting fans - Nathan and Damian Scattergood.

Translation is a tough business but, it also has a softer side too.

Damian Scattergood, our managing director, has a keen interest in science fiction and conlangers. Conlangers are people who create languages. See, ‘What is a Conlanger?’

Last week Damian went to MCM Comic Con in the RDS Dublin to check out the latest in Sci-Fi and got to meet some of his heroes.

There where a number of writers and actors on hand meeting their fans and sharing stories… Ian McNeice of Doctor Who was there, alongside Lyndie Greenwood of Sleepy Hollow and Danny John Jules and Hattie Hayridge of Red Dwarf.

The biggest STAR was Warwick Davis, famous for his roles in STAR Wars, Willow, Harry Potter and many more well know films. We, along with Damian’s son Nathan, had the opportunity to have a quick chat with Warwick. Damian is a huge STAR WARS fan so, he was thrilled to meet one of his own childhood heroes.

The 501st Legion were also on duty for the entire day. This is an amazing group of people who attend events in full STAR WARS gear. They work with charities and commercial organisations making events really stand out for kids, both big and small! For more information on the legion and how to hire them, visit the 501st Legion.

It was a great day and one we’d recommend to anyone interested in Sci-Fi in the future. Comic Con.

The 501st legion have words with Damian

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