Medical Miscommunication

Medical Miscommunication

Medical Miscommunication

From Poor Handwriting to Google Translate

Doctors’ handwriting had always been considered a menace around medical wards and general practices until recently a new one surfaced: Google Translate.

Anyone who has ever resorted to using Google’s alternative machine translation tool, even for non-medical reasons, knows what confusion it can cause.And yet this hasn’t discouraged medical staff from using GT during treatments. Typically, medics have to make quick decisions about a patient’s condition where no interpreters are present. In rolls Google Translate. It’s quick and easy so medical staff could get the gist of what their foreign national patients were saying.

Lost in Translation

A survey was carried out for the purpose of understanding what GT would return after translating 10 common medical phrases. The auto-translated phrases were then back translated by native human speakers of those languages — the results revealed all sorts of horrors. In one particular case, the medical English word “fitting”, a past participle of “to have seizures” was used: a mistranslation by medical staff whereby the English read, “your child is fitting”, in Swahili, it became “your child is dead”.

Another slightly less terrifying one was the Polish translation of a suggestion offered to relatives of a patient who either deceased, or nearly — “your husband has the opportunity to donate his organs”. To Google Translate and this in turn becomes, “your husband can donate his tools”!

Many other phrases churned out almost poetic translations such as one into Marathi (an Indian language) which read, “your husband had a cardiac arrest”. GT came out with, “your husband had an imprisonment of the heart”. In Bengali, the phrase, “your wife needs to be ventilated” resulted in, “your wife wind movement needed”. Imagining doctors and nurses alike repeating these poetic phrases adds a little humour. Perhaps not so much for the patients and their families.

Google Translate cannot recognise the context of the sentence or phrase it is translating, which results in mistranslations. Anybody relying on GT for formal communication may well find themselves in trouble, despite the hilarity of some of its flaws.

Have you ever come across any embarrassing mistranslations? Share your stories with us in the comments below.

The STAR Team

The Secret of Santa Claus — Track Santa on his journey

Santa Claus

Santa Claus

Christmas is almost upon us! And our thoughts are immediately drawn to the man himself: Santa. But who is he? Where did he come from? And how does he work so quickly?

Santa Claus is known by many names to children throughout the world: Saint Nick, Saint Nicholas, Sinterklaas (in the Netherlands) and Father Christmas. But how much do you really know about him? Aside from his incredibly long and virtually ever-growing list of boys’ and girls’ names, Mr Claus never seems to age at all.

Where did he come from?

There’s no substantial information on Santa’s origin, but historians claim that he is approximately 16 centuries old and that he was once referred to as Saint Nicholas, a 4th century Christian priest in the Middle East. Saint Nicholas was well-known for bestowing gifts to the less fortunate: sprinkling them down chimneys and hiding treats in stockings.

But how does Santa deliver so many presents to all the children around the world in one night?

We have always wondered how on earth Santa manages this feat. The guys at NORAD, who track Santa’s path on Christmas Eve every year, have speculated that “he does not work within time as we know!” “His whole trip may appear to us as taking only 24 hours, but to Santa it may last days, weeks or even months in standard time!”

Mindboggling, right? This might explain how he appears to move so fast in one night. While he’s working away and delivering his gifts as normal, to us he is travelling at speeds we can hardly imagine. NORAD came to the only logical conclusion, “that Santa functions within a different time-space continuum than the rest of us.” Despite our best efforts to unravel the enigma of Santa Claus, only he knows! Perhaps that’s what makes us adore him even more.

You can track Santa’s path on the 24th of December using NORAD’s Santa Tracker.

From all the team at STAR Translation, we wish you and yours a Merry Christmas!

The Migratory Language: Welsh

Flag of Wales

Flag of Wales

Over 150 years ago,  some 150 Welsh migrants took to the seas seeking a new way of life in the new world.

They gave themselves three places to choose from as their new home: Vancouver Island, Palestine or Argentina. Ultimately they chose Argentina to settle and establish a new colony as their home — a valley named Chubut in the region of Patagonia. The reason for their decision to settle in that part of South America was one of isolation. At the time, there were no other European settlements in the region, only indigenous tribes.

There was a lot of political radicalism in Wales during the 19th century and a growing sense of Welsh national consciousness engulfed many rural communities. They wanted to retain their national identity without the possibility of a passive English language invasion.

Politics & Religion

One man named Michael D. Jones, a radical, a religious man and nonconformist, was tired of the political and religious influences the English had over the Welsh population. Jones was a believer in the preservation of the Welsh language and traditions. It was he who became the leader of this like-minded community of travellers and partly his decision to travel to Argentina.

Jones had a single objective: to build a new Welsh colony overseas. One that is self-governing, democratic and nonconformist.

New Hope: Argentina

As all new beginnings bring hardships and struggle, the new Welsh colony had to overcome many difficult obstacles. When they arrived in 1865, they lived in caves along the coastline. But as the years went by, they experienced a golden age, a period of good fortune and prosperity: a time of economic and cultural growth swept through the settlement. They spoke only Welsh and preserved many national traditional such as the Eisteddfod (a traditional ceremony called “the chairing of the bard”).

Changing Times

Decades later, the Argentine government stepped in and enforced all community settlements in Argentina to learn and speak only Spanish. This meant that Spanish could only be taught at schools.  There wasn’t much the Welsh community could do but slowly adapt as the Spanish language took hold and Welsh eventually lost the battle. However, some families kept the language in the house. Old world Welsh traditions didn’t die out either and are still practiced to this day.

Centenary Celebrations & Revival

One hundred years on, 1965, there was a growth in interest in all things Welsh. Welsh culture and language began to reassert itself into the settlement. The small village in Chubut was finally connecting to Wales and there was a sense of appreciation among the villagers of the pioneering role the first settlers played.

Michael D. Jones migrated from Wales to save Welsh national identity and establish it elsewhere. But what he failed to realise was, that with immigration comes assimilation: the new country creates its own, new identity. However, the Welsh-Argentine community of Chubut will always remain proud of its roots.

The STAR Team

Source: BBC Magazine

Transit NXT now supports translation in Adobe FrameMaker 12

Transit NXT & FrameMaker 12

Transit NXT & FrameMaker 12

You can now translate Adobe FrameMaker 12 files in TransitNXT!

For data exchange with Transit, the enhanced FMGate plug-in is available. The plug-in additionally supports FrameMaker 12. Furthermore, the support for FrameMaker 7 to 11 has been enhanced.

The plug-in can be found on our STAR Group website in the Download » Transit & TermStarNXT » Accessories section. There you can also find the latest documentation on installing FMGate and sharing data with Transit.

To install the plug-in, you will need your licence number at hand. You can only install the plug-ins if the optional filter for Adobe FrameMaker has been enabled for your licence.

Call us to discuss your next project!

The STAR Team

Traditional Italian Recipe: Spaghetti alla Carbonara

As an international translation company we have many different people and nationalities working for us. Serena, one of our Italian project managers, was asked the other day about Spaghetti alla Carbonara — the Italian way! Often recipes are different around the world, even though they have the same name. So Serena took the time to do something different for us and share her traditional Italian dish. Hope you like it!

It’s a bit different from our normal blogs. Please see below for the English translation.

Recipe: Spaghetti alla Carbonara

Spaghetti alla Carbonara: Ingredienti

Spaghetti alla Carbonara: ricetta facile per tutti!

  • Difficoltà: Bassa
  • Cottura: 10 min
  • Preparazione: 15 min
  • Dosi per: 4 persone

INGREDIENTI:

  • Pancetta, 150 gr.
  • Olio d’oliva, 2/3 cucchiai
  • Pecorino, 200 gr.
  • Pepe, secondo i gusti
  • Spaghetti, 400 gr.
  • Uova di gallina, 3 tuorli + 1 intero

PREPARAZIONE:

  1. Versate in una padella grande un pó d’olio d’oliva e della pancetta tagliata a cubetti.
  2. Fate soffriggere la pancetta e spegnete il gas quando é ben cotta.
  3. Preparazione: 1-2

    Preparazione: 1-2

  4. Nel frattempo sbattete in una ciotola le uova e aggiungete il pecorino, il pepe nero (secondo i gusti), un pizzico di sale e una noce di burro. Amalgamate bene il tutto.
  5. Preparazione: 3

    Preparazione: 3

  6. Nel frattempo, mettete sul gas una pentola con dell‘acqua dentro per far cuocere la pasta. Quando l’ acqua bolle, aggiungete un pizzico di sale, e buttate la pasta che preferite, preferibilmente spaghetti. Fate attenzione a non far scuocere la pasta e a farla cuocere al dente, perché in fine verrà ripassata ancora in padella sul gas!
  7. Aggiungete alle uova la pancetta e mescolate bene tutto.
  8. Preparazione: 4-5

    Preparazione: 4-5

  9. Dopo aver scolato la pasta, mischiatela alle uova e alla pancetta e ripassate il tutto in padella a fuoco lento, per far cuocere l’uovo. Aggiungete ancora pepe e pecorino secondo i gusti. Mescolate bene la pasta con gli ingredienti a fuoco lento!
  10. Preparazione: 6

    Preparazione: 6

    Spaghetti alla Carbonara in padella

    Spaghetti alla Carbonara in padella

Buon Appetito!


English Version

Spaghetti alla Carbonara — An easy recipe for all to enjoy

  • Difficulty: easy
  • Cooking Time: 10 mins
  • Preparation Time: 15 mins
  • Serves: 4

INGREDIENTS:

  • Pancetta cubes: 150g
  • Olive oil: 2/3 tablespoon
  • Pecorino Cheese: 200g
  • Ground black pepper for seasoning
  • Spaghetti: 400g
  • 4 Eggs: 3 egg yolks +1 whole egg

Cooking Method:

  1. Heat a large frying pan on the hob, add the olive oil and the pancetta cubes and fry until lightly golden in colour
  2. Beat the egg yolks and the whole egg in a bowl, then add grated pecorino cheese, some black pepper, a knob of butter and mix everything well
  3. In the meantime, bring some water to the boil in a large saucepan and just when it starts boiling, add a couple of tablespoons of salt. Add the spaghetti and cook them for a further 8 minutes, or possibly until “al dente” because the pasta will be placed over the steam!
  4. Drain the spaghetti well, tip into the frying pan with the pancetta and beaten eggs. Add more grated pecorino cheese and mix thoroughly
  5. Let everything cook slowly [on the fire] for one minute. The heat from the spaghetti will be sufficient to partly cook the egg, but still leave it creamy
  6. Add as much pepper and pecorino cheese you want

Enjoy your meal!

The STAR Team

Translation Support for InDesign CC 2014

Transit NXT & InDesign CC 2014

Transit NXT & InDesign CC 2014

You can now translate Adobe InDesign CC 2014 files in TransitNXT!

For data exchange with Transit, there are new InDesign Gate plug-ins available for InDesign CC 2014 (Mac and Windows). Furthermore, you can now download and install enhanced InDesign Gate plug-ins for InDesign CS 2 to CS 6 and InDesign CC.

The plug-ins for your InDesign version can be found on our STAR Group website in the Download » Transit & TermStar NXT » Accessories section.

There you can also find the latest documentation on installing the InDesign Gate and sharing data with Transit.

Give us a call to discuss your next project.

The STAR Team

Black Friday, Explained

What is Black Friday?

What is Black Friday?

Just what is Black Friday?

To understand it, we need to look at the American national holiday of Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving takes place on the fourth Thursday of November and marks the beginning of the holiday season in the U.S.

First Coined

The term “Black Friday” was first coined in Philadelphia by the State Police Department there and was used to originally describe the heavy pedestrian and vehicle traffic which would occur the day after Thanksgiving. Black Friday had been used before the 1960s and its use spread throughout the U.S. around 1975 and onward.

Another Explanation

It had been seen as busy shopping day during the 1960s and stretching into the 2000s. Thus, over the years, another explanation was offered: retailers operated at a financial loss from January through November or “in the red” as it was known. And “Black Friday” indicated when they turned a profit or “in the black”. A term that started off with a negative connotation eventually went on to become a positive. This is the “Black Friday” we’ve come to hear about as we browse online stores.

Shopping Craze

Many retailers in the States were commonly known to open as early as 06:00 in the morning. But since 2011, stores such as Macy’s, Walmart, Kohl’s, Best Buy and Bealls went even further by opening as early as 05;00, even 04:00! Offering deals and promotions to early shoppers hoping to grab bargains for Christmastime has become something of a tradition in America. Even UK and Irish retailers, both on the streets and online have adopted this shopping experience craze.

Have you been affected by “Black Friday”? Let us know what you think in the comments box below.

The STAR Team

Sales Executive Jobs in Ireland – You’re Hired!

Sales Executive Wanted

Sales Executives - We Are Hiring

We’re looking for hard-working, competitive and self-motivated individuals who have some sales experience already and are interested in selling translation services.

We help companies do more business worldwide by providing the translation services they need for their brochures, documents and websites.

This is a great opportunity to be part of one of the largest translation companies in the world selling translation services in the B2B marketplace.

In this role, you will:
•    Prospect, qualify, develop and close leads
•    Interact with prospects via telephone, email, and face to face occasionally.
•    Sell translation services to new customers over the phone.
•    Sell using the complete sales cycle (Cold Calling, Quotes, Sales, Closing, Follow Up)
•    Make contact and generate new leads through research, networking and cold-calling.
•    Complete proposals and quotations

Requirements
•    Manage your sales pipeline and attend our daily report meetings.
•    Target clients in Ireland, UK and the USA
•    Successfully manage and overcome sales objections
•    Build rapport with prospects to be a trusted resource
•    Achieve monthly and quarterly sales targets
•    Deal with sales queries in an efficient, accurate and professional manner using excellent customer service and selling skills
•    Excellent communications skills both verbal and written.

Package:
•    SALARY: c. €22k basic + Commission.
•    Receive sales training from our team as well as training on the translation business.
•    20 days holidays per year
•    Work close to city centre – Dublin 3
•    TaxSaver scheme in place for employees for reduced travel costs.
•    Bicycle Scheme in place.
•    Free tea and coffee (and occasionally croissants)

Email your CV directly to Damian Scattergood at info @ star-ts.com

or reply to our ads our  social media channels.

-No agencies please.

Spelled v. Spelt — What’s the difference?

Spelled v Spelt

Spelled v Spelt

English language tenses are relatively straightforward compared to other European languages. Although some verbs are regular, there are many irregular ones.

Take for instance, the irregular verb “spell“. Its past tense and past participle are both “spelled” and “spelt“. But how do you know which one to use?

Well, both words are interchangeable. You can choose either one!

Spelt

Spelt has more than one meaning: it’s a hardy wheat grown mostly in Europe and it’s also the past participle of “spell”. In this case, we’re talking about the verb “spell”, which means to form words letter by letter in the correct sequence and to spell something out i.e. ‘He will spell out the problem again.’

It is chiefly British but had been widely used in American English until the early 1900s when “spelled” became more common.

Spelled

This spelling of the word is both past tense and past participle.

Conjugation of ‘to spell’
Base Form Spell
Past Simple Spelled / Spelt
Past Participle Spelled / Spelt
3rd person Singular Spells
Present participle / *Gerund Spelling

*Gerund: A verb which functions as a noun, in English, ending in ‘-ing’ (e.g. ‘asking’ in ‘do you mind my asking you?”)

The STAR Team

Rosetta Spacecraft to Make Historic Landing — Its Meaning Unearthed

Rosetta & The Comet Landing

Separation of Philae Lander from Rosetta Spacecraft

Separation of Philae Lander from Rosetta Spacecraft. ©2014 ESA

What’s happening now?

At 08:30 GMT on the 12th of November 2014, the Philae (spacecraft) (lander) separated from the Rosetta Mission spacecraft. The Rosetta spacecraft left Earth 10 years ago to make its journey to a distant comet known as Comet 67P/C-G.

This has never been achieved by humans before! But what’s its significance? It’s all about discovering the origins of our solar system. Scientists hope to be able to study the oldest building blocks of such systems: comets.

So why did the ESA — European Space Agency name it Rosetta?

In 1799, archaeologists found a volcanic basalt slab of rock near the Egyptian town of Rashid (Rosetta to us). Thus, the stone was named Rosetta and it helped revolutionise our understanding of an ancient civilisation.

There were three carved inscriptions on the stone, all written in two forms of Greek and Egyptian. The mysterious hieroglyphics — the written language of the ancient Egyptians, as they became known —  were eventually deciphered by historians. It was a breakthrough for scholars and linguists around the world and enabled the history of an almost forgotten culture to be pieced together.

The Rosetta Stone was the key to an ancient civilisation. The scientists at the ESA named their intrepid Rosetta mission so, as it will allow them to unlock the mysteries of all comets alike. And to better understand our solar system’s formation.

The lander is scheduled to rendezvous with comet 67P /C-G at 15:30 GMT on the 12th of November 2014.

Join the conversation on Twitter: Use #CometLanding

The STAR Team