The languages category features all of our blog posts relating to languages around the world. We post on topics and news about languages and people.

Animal names into different languages

Most Popular Animal Names in Different Languages

Animal names in different languages

Animal Names in Different Languages

Are you learning a new language? Ever wondered what the most well-known animals are called in different languages!

We’ve put together a list of recognisable animal names from ant to whale, monkey to platypus and many more from English into Irish, French, German, Spanish, Italian and Polish.

Irish Animal Names

Learning the Irish names for animals may spark your interested in the endangered language. How many do you already know?

Download the high quality PDF to use at home, in your office, share with friends or, if you’re a teacher, place in the classroom — it may inspire!

Graham,
The STAR Team

Speech bubbles containing names of languages

Guess that language

Speech bubbles containing names of languages, Guess that language

Guess that language!

Have you ever found yourself trying to read a piece of text to figure out what language it is?

I do this quite a lot when browsing online and when I come across unidentified words: those that aren’t English or Portuguese (the ones I know!). Or, if I’m travelling, I try to read some words in any given language despite not knowing how to pronounce them. It’s kind of fun, well, for someone who’s really interested in languages.

It’s always good to have something to base your educated guesses on; I’ve gathered some phrases from well-known languages to help you revise. You know, for testing yourself. This way, you’ll be mastering the art of guess that language!

Arabic نحن ننتمي إلى منظمة عريقة ذات تاريخ طويل مكلل بالنجاح. بدءا من نش أتها قبل ما يزيد على 011 عام كم نع محلي للمنتجات
Chinese 我们是这家历史悠久、业绩辉煌的公司的一员。自 100 多年以前当地的一家小型金属产品制造商到如今收入
Estonian Selle autoga saate kaasa tasuta juhi 16 järjestikuseks tunniks. Sõidate professionaalse juhiga, kes tunneb kohalikke…
Filipino Kasama sa espesyal na presyong ito ang libreng proteksiyon ng Personal na Seguro para sa Aksidente.
Greek Με αυτό το αυτοκίνητο παίρνετε δωρεάν σοφέρ για 16 συνεχόμενες ώρες Θα ταξιδέψετε με επαγγελματία οδηγό που γνωρίζει
Hebrew חירה באפשרות זו תזין את הכתובת הרשומה שלך. הכתובת שתוזן אוטומטית תחליף את כתובות החיוב והמשלוח שהזנת
בעצמך
Hungarian Ehhez az autóhoz 16 órányi folyamatos sofőrszolgálat is jár. Helyismerettel rendelkező, profi sofőrrel utazhat.
Icelandic Með þessum bíl færðu flýtiafgreiðslu við innritun, sem þýðir að þú getur farið fram fyrir röðina og þannig sparað tíma.
Indonesian Kita adalah bagian dari sebuah organisasi yang memiliki sejarah panjang dan sukses. Sejak awal berdiri lebih dari
Japanese ユーザー名が既に使用中です。パスワードの確認入力がパスワードと一致しません。ユーザーの追加
Korean 사용자 이름이 이미 사용되고 있습니다. 암호가 필요합니다. 최소한 하나의 시스템 계정이 필요합니다.
Latvian šo automašīnu jūs saņemsit ātrās registrēšanās pakalpojumu — jums nebūs jāstāv rindā un varēsit būt starp
Lithuanian Su šiuo automobiliu nemokamai galėsite naudotis vairuotojo paslaugomis. Keliausite su profesionaliu vairuotoju…
Malay Maklumat berkenaan topik seperti:etika, keselamatan, kerahsiaan, diskriminasi, budaya syarikat dan
Mongolian Ялангуяа GPХ цувралын илрүүлэгч төхөөрөмж олборлолтын БҮХ нөхцөлд бусад ЯМАР ч илрүүлэгчээс илүү гүнд алтыг олдог
Polish To oznacza szczere postępowanie, zgodne z przepisami prawa oraz zasadami CLARCOR Zgłaszaj wszelkie podejrzenia złamania zasad
Russian При заказе этого автомобиля Вы бесплатно получаете дополнительную подушку сиденья
Tagalog
Parts of Indonesia
Estratehiya at Teknolohiya – Pangmatagalang Kaunlaran
Ukrainian При замовленні цього автомобіля Ви безкоштовно отримуєте дитяче крісло (для дітей від 9 місяців до

Graham,
The STAR Team

Irish Culture

Gaeltacht sees Irish in decline

Irish in decline in Gaeltacht

Irish in Decline, Gaeltacht

Irish is in swift decline and may become a secondary language in the Gaeltacht communities, a report states.

It was filed in a report on the 29th of May, that Irish will no longer be the primary language of any Gaeltacht community in ten years from now. Commissioned by the State agency Údarás na Gaeltachta and based on census figures from 2006 to 2011, the language has been declining faster than expected. And declining more rapidly than suggested in a similar report from 2007.

Findings

Confined to a mostly academic setting, those of classrooms … Irish is less spoken in social environments. The report which announces its findings by authors of the publications lacks any methods of preserving the language. This is now in dispute between Údarás na Gaeltachta and the authors. However, Údarás has agreed to file a second report for the recommendations on how to preserve Irish in the Gaeltacht communities.

The Figures

Despite all this, the research in the original report shows that of 155 electoral divisions within the Gaeltacht, only 21 are communities where Irish is spoken on a daily basis by 67% of its population. 67% is regarded as a tipping point for language survival among experts.

Rónán Ó Domhnaill, the Irish language commissioner has expressed his concerns over the declining use of Irish in the Gaeltacht. Ó Domhnaill commented, “currently, there is no requirement in the Languages Act, that the state should conduct its business through Irish, and that this needs to be looked at.”

The STAR Team

Source: RTÉ News

Language Lovers Nominations 2015

Language Lovers Nominations 2015

We’ve been nominated in the Top Language Lovers 2015 Awards

Language Lovers Nominations 2015, STAR on Twitter

It’s time to vote for your favourite language lovers nominations of 2015.

The guys at Lexiophiles, powered by bab.la have nominated our Twitter account under the category of Language Twitter account: tweeters who share content about languages. We’re thrilled to be nominated this year but we need your help to make it to the voting phase of the awards. (Language Lovers Nominations)

Nominate your Favourite Language Lover!

We’ll share the link when it’s time to vote (26th May to 14th June) for your Favourite Language Lover of 2015!

About Lexiophiles’ Top 100 Awards

The awards are brought to you by Lexiophiles with their yearly Top Language Lovers.

It was first established in 2008 to award the 100 best blogs for languages, but the competition has grown a lot and there are now five categories:

  • Language Learning Blogs
  • Language Professional Blogs
  • Language Facebook Pages
  • Language Twitter accounts
  • Language YouTube channels

The STAR Team

Difference between explicitly and implicitly

Do you trust explicitly or implicitly?

When to use explicitly or implicitly
Do you trust explicitly or implicitly? What’s the difference?

When to use explicitly or implicitly

Explicitly and implicitly are two words you may write in a letter or in an email to a dear friend, a confidant or a colleague at work, but some of us still get a little confused.

We either write trust explicitly or trust implicitly. What’s causing this confusion? Aren’t they both the same words!

The short answer is no; they’re not the same nor are they interchangeable.

The adverb, explicitly means, to be clear about something, leaving no room for question or doubt; to be clear in a detailed manner. While implicitly, another adverb, means to state something in a way that is not directly expressed. In other words, it is without question; it’s implied.

If you can substitute absolutely for implicitly then you’re on the right track.

Therefore, if you say that you trust her explicitly then you trust her without a doubt. It’s a final decision.

It’s common to say trust implicitly, as your trust is so strong that it goes without saying. There’s no need to be explicit about trust. You’re not trying to avoid any confusion by stating it directly.

We found this short and easy-to-understand comparison between the two.

Quick Recap

Explicitly (adv.)
to be clear about something; leaving no room for question or doubt; to be clear in a detailed manner
Implicitly (adv.)
to state something in a way that is not directly expressed

The STAR Team

Middle East Translation - Free Whitepaper

The Meaning of Easter

Meaning of Easter

Eggs-travagant!

Meaning of Easter and Its Origin

For all of us nowadays, Easter is about chocolate eggs, feasting with family and friends and relaxing over a long weekend. But the meaning of Easter and its word origins are over a millenium old.

It all started back in the 7th century AD with an English monk named Bede. He was quoted in his scriptures noting Ēosturmōnaþ, Old English for Month of Ēostre. That, translated in Bede’s time as Paschal month and was also an English month.

Easter, Ēostre and Ēastrun

In modern English, the term Easter, a cognate with modern German Ostern, developed from an Old English word that appears in the form Ēastrun, -on, or -an; but also as Ēastru, -o; and Ēastre or Ēostre. This month corresponds with April for which Bede was referred to it as “was once called after a goddess of theirs named Ēostre, in whose honour feasts were celebrated in that month”.

“The Sunday following the full Moon which falls on or after the equinox will give the lawful Easter.” — Bede

Etymology

Originally, the word denoted the Jewish festival of Passover, commemorating the story of the Exodus. In the 50s of the 1st century (150 – 160 AD), Paul, writing from Ephesus to the Christians in Corinth, applied the term to Christ, and it is unlikely that the Ephesian and Corinthian Christians were the first to hear Exodus 12 interpreted as speaking about the death of Jesus, not just about the Jewish Passover ritual! That’s when modern Christianity talks about the resurrection of Christ. And hence the fasting leading up until Easter time.

In most of the non-English speaking world, this feast is known by names derived from the Greek and Latin word, Πάσχα and Pashca, respectively. Pascha is derived from Aramaic: פסחא, a cognate to the Hebrew word, פֶּסַח (Pesach).

Now, where’s that chocolate egg of mine? It’s time to feast!

Graham,
The STAR Team

What’s the difference between specially and especially?

Better English, difference between specially and especially

Difference between specially and especially

Difference Between Specially and Especially in English

It’s probably not something you put much thought into, and just went with whatever sounded right to you. But there are subtle differences between both words.

Instead of just diving in and explaining these differences, let’s start with some sample sentences. Can you tell us if they’re correct or not?

  1. I don’t want to be treated especially.
  2. It’s difficult to learn a new language, especially when you’re older.
  3. The service at the hotel was specially good.
  4. His speech was written specially for this occasion.

Which ones would you like to change?

Warning: the answers are at the bottom!

The Explanations

Figured them out yet? If not, then perhaps the definition of each will help…

Both are adverbs; they are not interchangeable, although in some instances they can be reversed.

Specially
Used to mean for a particular purpose

Examples (of specially in use):

  • This shower gel is specially designed for people with sensitive skins.
  • This computer programme is specially for children with learning difficulties.
  • My father made this model aeroplane specially for me.
Especially
Used to mean above all or particularly
Often used before adjectives; meaning particularly

Examples (of especially in use):

  • These butterflies are particularly noticeable in April and May, especially in these meadows.
  • You’ll enjoy playing tennis at our local club, especially on weekdays when it’s not so busy.
  • The road between Cairo and Alexandria is especially dangerous at night.
  • It’s a bit nippy, but it’s not especially cold for this time of year.

Special — Especial

The adjective especial is rarely used today. It’s only use is confined to particular contexts where it collocates with nouns, e.g. especial interest, especial value. Especial is only used to emphasize the exceptional value or nature of what is is describing.

The other adjective special means important, or something that is different from the norm.

Examples (of special in use):

  • You’re a special person…
  • On special occasions…
  • In special situations…
  • She is a special adviser…
  • Special effects
  • Special offer!

The Answers

Feeling learned! Do you have your answers at the ready?

At the beginning, we asked you which sample sentences are correct and which ones aren’t…

  1. Incorrect: it’s specially NOT especially
  2. Correct: it’s especially
  3. Incorrect: it’s especially NOT specially
  4. Both: it’s correct to use both adverbs in that example, but it’s common to use especially!

The STAR Team

Examples of use from the BBC’s Learn English courses

International Day of La Francophonie

International Organisation of the Francophonie, International Day of La Francophonie

International Organisation of the Francophonie

Celebrate the International Day of la Francophonie (Journée internationale de la Francophonie) with us! Our office in Dublin employs skilled native French project managers among other nationalities. Therefore, in honour of the French language and culture and to appreciate our French team in-house, we would like to give you a little background information on this day.

The Organisation

The International Organisation of the Francophonie (IOF) is an organisation responsible for the promotion of not just the French language and culture, but humanist values: democracy and human rights, throughout the world. Its head office is based in Paris and it has four permanent representations in:

  • Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (the African Union and at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa)
  • Brussels, Belgium (the EU)
  • New York, USA
  • Geneva, Switzerland (the UN)

Also, the IOF has three regional offices located in West Africa; Central Africa and Indian Ocean and Asia-Pacific). Each office is located in Lomé (Togo), Libreville (Gabon) and Hanoi (Vietnam), respectively. And with an additional two regional antennas in Bucharest, Romania and Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

The French Speaking World

Observed annually on the 20th of March, the International Organisation of La Francophonie was created in 1970.

Its mission is to embody the active solidarity between its 80 member states and governments (57 members and 23 observers)

Their website aims at enabling its users to:

  • Discover the extent of the IOF’s vitality and wealth, its diverse cultures, accents and partner languages
  • Inform of the IOF’s latest political activities and to promote peace, democracy and human rights worldwide
  • Learn about the cooperative measures to promote the French language, cultural diversity, sustainable development, education and training
  • Surf the Web more easily using RSS feeds and to discover all the French language resources available online
  • Access a database comprising thousands of photos, videos and audio content

Visit the International Organisation of La Francophonie for all the latest information.

Francophonie in Ireland!

The French Embassy in Ireland has a page dedicated to the IOF. There, you can discover events happening around the country involving the French language and culture.

Interested in the French language? Then why not leave us a comment in French!

You can also engage with others on Twitter using #francophonie.

The STAR Team

Saint Patrick’s Day 2015

Happy Saint Patrick's Day 2015

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day 2015

This year’s Saint Patrick’s festival will kick off on Saturday 14th of March up to the day itself on the 17th of March.

The Irish government established the festival of Saint Patrick’s in November 1995. Their aim was to be among the greatest Saint Patrick’s festivals that take place around the world. One of which that the ‘owners’ of St. Patrick’s Day (and the festival alike), the Irish people, could be proud.

Saint Patrick’s is the only national holiday that is celebrated in more countries than any other. It’s a day when everybody, no matter what background, wants to be Irish!

Why the festival was established

Patrick’s Day and festival was started to rank among all of the greatest celebrations in the world. Just as the Chinese New Year is celebrated the world over, so too is Patrick’s Day. The festival creates an excitement throughout Ireland and inspires innovation, creativity, grassroots involvement, and marketing activity for all businesses.

It helps involve, provide opportunity and motivation for all those who claim Irish descent, and those who sometimes wish they were Irish, to attend and join in the imaginative and expressive celebrations. The festival aims at projecting an accurate image of Ireland to the world, and one that is seen as a creative, professional and sophisticated country that can appeal to everyone.

Plan your Saint Patrick’s Day 2015 Festival with the numerous events taking place throughout Ireland. As usual, the Saint Patrick’s Day parade comes to life on the 17th of March.

Useful Irish Language Resources

We have lots of free Irish language phrases for you to start learning…

Get a quote on Irish Translation Services for your next project.

Graham,
The STAR Team

Know your Irish Public Holidays

Seachtain na Gaeilge 2015

Seachtain na Gaeilge 2015

Seachtain na Gaeilge 2015

Seachtain na Gaeilge 2015

Seachtain na Gaeilge 2015, Ireland’s Cultural Festival

This year’s Seachtain na Gaeilge, also known as SnaG (Irish Language Week), runs from the 1st to the 17th of March.

SnaG is one of the biggest festivals of our national language and culture in Ireland. It runs up to Saint Patrick’s Day on the 17th of March, and is celebrated in many other countries.

What’s on?

As of the 1st of March:

  • Irish week at Blackrock Castle Observatory
  • Irish films at the IFI, Temple Bar, Dublin city
  • Placename exhibition, Gorey, Wexford
  • Irish Alphabet, botanical art exhibition, Bunclody, Wexford
  • Storytelling with Seó Ó Maolalaí, Halla Contae Fhine Gall

For a full list of the many events taking place around the country, visit the official SnaG website.

About the Festival

Anyone can take part in the hundred of events organised around the country. If you’re enthusiastic about the Irish language and eager to increase your knowledge of it, then find out what events are planned in your local area. Since local authorities and volunteers run many events, there’s sure to be one in your vicinity.

No matter what grade of Irish speaker you are: fluent, learner or a novice, there are numerous entertaining and fun events to suit all ages and walks of life.

Croí na teanga — it’s you!

You can get involved with voluntary and community groups, local authorities, schools, libraries, and music, sports, arts and culture organisations; help organise events for SnaG in your area.

Why is SnaG running for two weeks?

Seachtain na Gaeilge was established in 1902 and is an annual festival in celebration of the Irish language and culture. It’s a widely recognised brand name and understood across Ireland. Its festivals have grown from strength-to-strength in recent years, thus the festival’s duration has grown from a week to up to two weeks. Since Seachtain na Gaeilge is the original brand name, it had been decided that it felt right to keep it!

Are you interested in the Irish language or Irish culture? Leave us a comment in Irish to test your skills.

Graham,
The STAR Team