The public sector category features all blog posts related to translation services for the state-controlled economy; other posts may include news about the Irish government.

Four Courts, Dublin

Not translating into Irish could see legal cases dismissed

Four Courts, Dublin, not translating into irish could see legal cases dismissed
Image: Four Courts, Dublin / Wikipedia

Key legislation remains in English only

It was reported in The Journal today that criminal cases across the country could be adjourned or even dismissed as a result of the state’s failure to have 11-year-old legislation translated into Irish.

Solicitor, Samantha Geraghty, speaking on RTÉ Radio na Gaeltachta said the government has failed in its constitutional obligation to translate the Civil Liability and Courts Act 2004. Summonses are issued because of this piece of legislation. A judge from Belmullet district court, Mayo said that of such a breach “an order of prohibition could apply to appropriate cases.” Simply put, if a translation of the Act is not produced by 21st of March 2016, then there is a danger that some cases may be thrown out.

There is a constitutional right to have your case defended in Irish without disadvantage and that can’t happen if the law is not available in Irish,” Samantha Geraghty added.

According to a spokesperson from the Oireachtas, the Act is currently being translated into Irish and will be available shortly.

Source: The Journal

The STAR Team

“Uncancelling” of the EC Translation Technology Tender

EC Translation Technology Tender

This week on the Common Sense Advisory website, the EC has uncancelled its Ted tender for CAT tools. Quite an interesting story for those following translation technology and political institutions.

In 2010, the European Commission (EC) opened a tender for bids on computer-assisted translation, or computer-aided translation (CAT), and translation memory (TM) tools to which a number of well-known industry firms responded.

In July 2011, a corrigendum was issued declaring the awarding procedure unsuccessful. The reason given … “none of the submitted tenders met the minimum quality criteria.”

Understandably, the companies that invested time and cost in responding to the tender expressed disappointment.

For more information, visit the Common Sense Advisory.

The STAR Team

UK Police spend £2,700 an hour on translators

£2,700 an hour on translators

A recent poll conducted by the Conservative Party in the UK revealed that the UK police forces spent almost £2,700 an hour on translators in 2007.

This was spent on translation and interpreting between witnesses and suspects.

A total bill of £24 million for translation in 2006/07 was returned.

This was up 64pc from the 2004 figure of £14 million.

The data and figures were gathered by the Conservatives as part of a Freedom of Information request to forces in England and Wales.

The STAR Team