The Ireland tag features articles that mention Ireland, its people and culture and any content that relates to Ireland and its markets.

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European parliament, English not official language after Brexit

English not an official language after Brexit

European parliament, English not official language after Brexit

European parliament hemicycle in Strasbourg / Image credit: Wikipedia

English not official language, MEP warns

According to a senior MEP, English will not be an official EU language after Brexit.

English could lose its status as an official language as apparently no other EU country has English listed as an official language.

Onced Britain leaves the EU, English will be stripped of its status warned Danuta Hübner. Hübner, an economist, is head of the European Parliament’s Constitutional Affairs Committee (AFCO).

There are 24 official languages in the EU; the UK identified English as it own official language while Ireland notified Irish and Malta notified Maltese. Both countries also list English as their second official language. However, when Ireland and Malta joined the EU English was already an official language. Therefore both nations opted to list their other official languages instead.

We have a regulation … where every EU country has the right to notify one official language. The Irish have notified Gaelic, and the Maltese have notified Maltese, so you have only the UK notifying English.

Even though English may be removed as an official language, “English is one of the working languages in the European institutions, Hübner commented, adding: “it’s actually the dominating language.” It’s one of the most frequently used by EU civil servants.

If they want to keep English as an official language, the remaining countries would have vote to keep its status unanimously, Hübner noted.

EU Regulations

However, an EU source explained that the regulations governing official languages are themselves subject to more than one translation.

A regulation from 1958 regarding the official languages of the EU, was originally written in French and does not clearly state whether a member country, i.e. Ireland or Malta, can have more than one official language.

Interpretations of the French wording of this body of text concludes that this might be possible, whereas the English version says otherwise.

The regulation states that “if a member state has more than one official language, the language to be used shall, at the request of such state, be governed by the general rules of its law.”

According to reports from the Wall Street Journal, ‘the Commission has already started using French and German more often in its external communications’, after the UK voted to leave the EU last Thursday.

The STAR Team

Source: Politico EU

Gaeltacht sign in An Ghaeltacht

English translations anger Gaeltacht

Gaeltacht sign in An Ghaeltacht

An Ghaeltacht sign in the region / Image credit: TCD

Gaeltacht community anger over names in English

In a 2015 annual report by the Irish Language Commissioner, the highest number of complaints under the new Eircode postal system related to the translation of place names in the Gaeltacht region.

Rónán Ó Domhnaill, head of the office of An Coimisnéir Teanga expressed that he was not surprised at the level of anger in the Gaeltacht communities. More than 70 complaints were noted in the report. All complaints related to the English translation of Irish names and addresses without any Irish version.

Conradh na Gaeilge, the Irish language group, stated that up to 50,000 household in the Gaeltacht area are affected by the new system and called on the department to amend it.

Rónán Ó Domhnaill also reported that the Department of Communications had ‘breached a statutory language obligation during the rollout of the postcodes – Eircode’.

Irish Proficiency

As of today’s report, there is a reluctance on behalf of certain government departments to identify jobs requiring a proficiency in the Irish language. Mr Ó Domhnaill stated on the ‘serious questions that arise on the State’s willingness to provide services of the same standard in both languages’.

Source: RTÉ News

The STAR Team

Enterprise Ireland, East Point Business Park

Exports up by 10%, Enterprise Ireland Companies

Enterprise Ireland exports up by 10%, East Point Business Park

Enterprise Ireland reports its companies’ exports up by 10% last year, East Point Business Park / Image credit: RTÉ

Exports up by 10% last year, Enterprise Ireland reports

Enterprise Ireland reported in its annual business review that its companies saw an increase in exports up by 10% last year – an all-time high of €20.6 billion.

Enterprise Ireland helps Irish companies export to international markets.

EI also noted that growth was seen in exports across all sectors and in most export markets.

Export Sectors

A 32% increase saw exports of internationally traded software to €1.8 billion; construction and consumers firms saw an increase in exports of 21%, a total of €2.8 billion.

Manufacturing companies reported growth by 11% showing a total of €3.4 billion and food exports grew by 3% reporting, a total of €10.6 billion.

The figures announced today show the strength and capabilities of Irish companies competing at a global level — Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor.

Exports to the USA and Canada grew by 27% to almost €3 billion, while those to the UK rose by 12% to €7.5 billion and Northern Ireland increased by 8% to €4.2 billion.

“The 2015 export figure of €20.6 billion demonstrates the scale of the success that Irish companies are seeing in terms of winning business at record levels internationally”, Julie Sinnamon, CEO of Enterprise Ireland remarked. 429 overseas presences were established, including 200 in high-growth markets.

The UK remains our largest export market, exports there have ‘fallen from 45% in 2005 to 37% in 2015’, the agency stated.

Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor commented that ‘Irish companies continue to deliver for the Irish economy.’

The STAR Team

Source: RTÉ News

1916 Remembrance Wall unveils misspelling in Irish

1916 Remembrance Wall Unveils Misspelling

Easter Rising Remembrance Wall Unveils Misspelling

The unveiling of the 1916 Easter Rising Remembrance Wall on Sunday 3rd of April commemorated those who lost their lives in the rebellion 100 years ago.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny attended and laid a wreath in honour of the dead. Almost 500 people died in the uprising, of which 268 were civilians caught up in the violence.

1916 Remembrance Wall unveils misspelling in Irish
Missplaced Fada / RollingNews.ie

What was surprising to many was the misspelling of the Irish translation of Easter Rising 1916, Eírí amach na Cásca should have read Éirí amach na Cásca. Conradh na Gaeilge said the mistake illustrates a laziness towards the Irish language, and can’t understand why those involved didn’t ensure that the Irish was as accurate and correct as the English spelling.

Furthermore, in a statement the day after, the Glasnevin Trust has said:

There is a misplaced fada in the spelling of the word “Éirí ” on the Necrology Wall unveiled yesterday at Glasnevin cemetery. It will be corrected immediately.

The STAR Team

Sources: The Journal and RTÉ News

Coleslaw and dips, Irish

9 Irish Language Translations, so bad they’re good

9 Hilarious Irish Language Translations

The Irish language is beautiful, but it also finds itself playing catch up with the modern world. So much so that it becomes blatantly obvious with some of these Irish language translations.

We found nine particularly unimaginative translations making their rounds on the Internet. These are too good to miss.

1

Coleslaw, Irish

Very creative.

2

Coleslaw and dips, Irish language translations

Feeling fluent already.

3

This is truly exceptional.

4

Hipster, Irish

The direct approach!

5

Mblíp!

6

Laser, Irish

L.A.S.E.R: light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.

L.É.A.S.A.R: Hmm.

7

Spaghetti, Irish

Keeping it simple.

8

Nua technolaíocht. Wonder what that could mean?

9

Wouldn’t have guessed!

The STAR Team

Source: The Journal

IEDR, Irish Web addresses showing fadas

Web Addresses showing Fadas to Become Reality

IEDR, Irish Web addresses showing fadas
Ireland’s Domain Registry / IEDR website

Irish Registry Domain to make Web Addresses showing Fadas a reality

Organizations and businesses in Ireland will very soon be able to register Irish Web addresses with fadas. This will change will enable Irish businesses using the .ie domain to also include any fadas contained in their names. Effectively, we will see Irish websites’ URLs with the fada included. That is, if their domain is an Irish name or word.

The fada is the acute accent or diacritic above all Irish vowels: á, é, í, ó and ú.

Recently, the IE Domain Registry, responsible for the administration of Ireland’s official Internet address .ie, has begun a consultation process to allow users to share their views about how the system should operate.

The registry will launch details of how people can register the fada domain names after the 21st of March.

We will be on the lookout for any domains using their fadas.

Read our article on 49 Reasons the Fada is Important in Irish

Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation

Sources: IEDR and The Journal.ie

Four Courts, Dublin

Not translating into Irish could see legal cases dismissed

Four Courts, Dublin, not translating into irish could see legal cases dismissed
Image: Four Courts, Dublin / Wikipedia

Key legislation remains in English only

It was reported in The Journal today that criminal cases across the country could be adjourned or even dismissed as a result of the state’s failure to have 11-year-old legislation translated into Irish.

Solicitor, Samantha Geraghty, speaking on RTÉ Radio na Gaeltachta said the government has failed in its constitutional obligation to translate the Civil Liability and Courts Act 2004. Summonses are issued because of this piece of legislation. A judge from Belmullet district court, Mayo said that of such a breach “an order of prohibition could apply to appropriate cases.” Simply put, if a translation of the Act is not produced by 21st of March 2016, then there is a danger that some cases may be thrown out.

There is a constitutional right to have your case defended in Irish without disadvantage and that can’t happen if the law is not available in Irish,” Samantha Geraghty added.

According to a spokesperson from the Oireachtas, the Act is currently being translated into Irish and will be available shortly.

Source: The Journal

The STAR Team

Start-up Ireland

Ready, Set, Start-up Ireland!

Start-up Ireland

Start-up Ireland — 5 Days · 5 Cities · 5 Industries

Start-up Ireland

The most comprehensive map of Ireland’s start-up ecosystem has been produced by the guys at Start-up Ireland. The “gathering” is being dubbed as one of the biggest national events in the world and will take place across five Irish cities over five days and includes five industries …

The Start-up Map displays, for example, more than 844 start-ups, 132 multinationals and 71 sources of funding.

The gathering commences on the 5th to the 10th of October 2015, with over 50 events being planned so far.

If you’re a start-up and haven’t registered your place on the map, then contact [email protected].

Start-up, The Five Cities

The events will run in Cork, Dublin, Galway, Limerick and Waterford with the aim of channelling and growing the start-up sector throughout Ireland.

The gathering’s theme is “Start, Scale and Succeed from Ireland”, and it will mainly promote entrepreneurship, and develop world-class regional “start-up hubs” around existing industry strengths in Ireland. This will provide fuel for potential start-ups and those already in the market may scale up!

The Gathering is set to showcase Ireland as a leading start-up sector for multinational entrepreneurs, investors and R&D teams. The initiative is backed by the Irish government and may attract up to 15,000 people. Its creators aim to make Ireland a “start-up-hub” by 2020.

Follow the latest updates using #StartUpIRL.

If you’re a new company starting up, STAR can help you Start, Scale and Succeed in international markets. We provide translation services for websites, documents and apps in over 70 languages. Let’s start something big together.

Graham,
The STAR Team

Irish Culture

Gaeltacht sees Irish in decline

Irish in decline in Gaeltacht

Irish in Decline, Gaeltacht

Irish is in swift decline and may become a secondary language in the Gaeltacht communities, a report states.

It was filed in a report on the 29th of May, that Irish will no longer be the primary language of any Gaeltacht community in ten years from now. Commissioned by the State agency Údarás na Gaeltachta and based on census figures from 2006 to 2011, the language has been declining faster than expected. And declining more rapidly than suggested in a similar report from 2007.

Findings

Confined to a mostly academic setting, those of classrooms … Irish is less spoken in social environments. The report which announces its findings by authors of the publications lacks any methods of preserving the language. This is now in dispute between Údarás na Gaeltachta and the authors. However, Údarás has agreed to file a second report for the recommendations on how to preserve Irish in the Gaeltacht communities.

The Figures

Despite all this, the research in the original report shows that of 155 electoral divisions within the Gaeltacht, only 21 are communities where Irish is spoken on a daily basis by 67% of its population. 67% is regarded as a tipping point for language survival among experts.

Rónán Ó Domhnaill, the Irish language commissioner has expressed his concerns over the declining use of Irish in the Gaeltacht. Ó Domhnaill commented, “currently, there is no requirement in the Languages Act, that the state should conduct its business through Irish, and that this needs to be looked at.”

The STAR Team

Source: RTÉ News

SURE Thing: Start-up Refunds for Entrepreneurs

SURE Tax relief for start-ups, Start-up refunds for entrepreneurs

SURE: Tax relief for start-ups

Start-up Refunds for Entrepreneurs, Ireland

Are you thinking of starting a new company? Then you could be due a tax refund under SURE: Start-up Refunds for Entrepreneurs.

SURE is a tax refund scheme, and is a joint initiative of the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation and Revenue.

If you’re starting your own business, you may be entitled to an income tax refund of up to 41% of the capital funding that you invest in your company under SURE. Depending on the size of your investment, you may be entitled to a refund of PAYE income tax that you previously paid over six years prior to the year in which you invest.

General conditions for SURE; you must:

  • Establish a new company and engage in qualifying trading activity(ies)
  • Invest money in the new company by way of purchasing new shares
  • Have had mainly PAYE income in the previous four years
    • This would include a person currently in PAYE-type employment, an unemployed person, a person recently made redundant or a retired person
  • Take up full-time employment in the new company either as a director or an employee

You can also estimate your potential SURE refund using their Online Calculator*. Make best use of the online calculator by following the information outlined below:

  1. Details of the likely investment amount
  2. Details of your income and PAYE tax paid
    • This information is on your P60 or P21. If you’re investing an amount greater than one year of income, you’ll need your P60 / P21 for more than one year

*Terms and conditions will prompt upon click

Revenue: Irish Tax and Customs has more information on SURE

The STAR Team