MindReader for Outlook

STAR Groups Wins Award for MindReader

STAR Group wins award for MindReader
Award for MindReader for Outlook / STAR Translation Imaging

STAR Group Won IT Innovation Award for MindReader

Mindreader for Outlook awarded IT innovation Award at a digital conference for businesses in Germany, CeBIT 2016. The award was in the category ‘Office Management’. STAR Group was there to receive it.

MindReader

The plug-in supports Outlook users with text suggestions from previous emails and thus, eliminates the need for time-consuming sentence formulation.

MindReader for Outlook is specially suited to SMEs. Training is unnecessary as MindReader automatically, and continuously learns from sent emails. The jury who awarded the prize consisted of professors, IT-industry experts, researchers and journalists.

In the professional environment of technical writers, our ‘authoring memory’ tools are already well established – Josef Zibung, CEO of STAR Group.

With MindReader for Outlook, we now bring professional technology as a streamlined and simple solution to the office environment. This innovation benefits everyone who writes emails — practically everyone.

MindReader for Outlook is available as a standalone or corporate license. The standalone license can be purchased via the STAR Group shop.

Source: STAR Group

The STAR Team

STAR Group Donates Transit to Universities in Ho Chi Minh City

STAR Group Donates Transit NXT to Universities in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The STAR Group donates Transit to two universities in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. They will receive Transit NXT as part of their CAT software tools; the University of Social Sciences and Humanities and Hoa Sen University.

Josef Zibung, president of the STAR Group in Ramsen, Switzerland paid visit to Ho Chi Minh City to present the STAR Transit NXT suite.

Since STAR also operates in Vietnam, they will be providing full support to the faculties involved in implementing training and use of Transit to students.

We provide Vietnamese translation of websites, brochures and documents to all our customers.

The STAR Team

Coleslaw and dips, Irish

9 Irish Language Translations, so bad they’re good

9 Hilarious Irish Language Translations

The Irish language is beautiful, but it also finds itself playing catch up with the modern world. So much so that it becomes blatantly obvious with some of these Irish language translations.

We found nine particularly unimaginative translations making their rounds on the Internet. These are too good to miss.

1

Coleslaw, Irish

Very creative.

2

Coleslaw and dips, Irish language translations

Feeling fluent already.

3

This is truly exceptional.

4

Hipster, Irish

The direct approach!

5

Mblíp!

6

Laser, Irish

L.A.S.E.R: light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation.

L.É.A.S.A.R: Hmm.

7

Spaghetti, Irish

Keeping it simple.

8

Nua technolaíocht. Wonder what that could mean?

9

Wouldn’t have guessed!

The STAR Team

Source: The Journal

IEDR, Irish Web addresses showing fadas

Web Addresses showing Fadas to Become Reality

IEDR, Irish Web addresses showing fadas
Ireland’s Domain Registry / IEDR website

Irish Registry Domain to make Web Addresses showing Fadas a reality

Organizations and businesses in Ireland will very soon be able to register Irish Web addresses with fadas. This will change will enable Irish businesses using the .ie domain to also include any fadas contained in their names. Effectively, we will see Irish websites’ URLs with the fada included. That is, if their domain is an Irish name or word.

The fada is the acute accent or diacritic above all Irish vowels: á, é, í, ó and ú.

Recently, the IE Domain Registry, responsible for the administration of Ireland’s official Internet address .ie, has begun a consultation process to allow users to share their views about how the system should operate.

The registry will launch details of how people can register the fada domain names after the 21st of March.

We will be on the lookout for any domains using their fadas.

Read our article on 49 Reasons the Fada is Important in Irish

Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation

Sources: IEDR and The Journal.ie

Mount Elbrus, The Caucasus region

10 Oldest Languages Still Spoken Today

Mount Elbrus, The Caucasus region, 10 oldest languages still spoken today

Mount Elbrus, Europe’s highest mountain in the Caucasus region between Europe and Asia. A region known for its linguistic diversity / Wikipedia

10 Oldest Languages in Use Today

It is almost impossible to judge how old one language is from another. The evolution of language is virtually similar to biological evolution; like evolution, changes to a language happen minutely over the course of generations. However, there is no clearly discernible difference between one language and the next language, from which a language derived.

Despite this, each of the ten languages listed are considerably ancient yet still spoken today. Each with an intriguing history that differentiates it from a multitude of others.

Those 10 Ancient Languages

Hebrew
The Hebrew language is an interesting case on this list: it fell out of common usage circa 400 CE. Yet it remained preserved as a liturgical language for Jews around the world. The rise of Zionism in the 19th and 20th centuries revived the language until it became the official language of Israel. Hebrew speakers can fully understand the Old Testament in its original writings.
Tamil
Spoken by circa 78 million people, Tamil is officially recognized as a language of India, Sri Lanka and Singapore. This classical language has survived the ages. Dating back to the third century BCE, and still in continuous use today.
Lithuanian
Lithuanian, like most European languages, is Indo-European in origin. This group divided up c.3500 BCE. The most fascinating feature of Lithuanian is that it retained the sounds and grammar of its Proto-Indo-European ancestor, unlike that of its cousins.
Farsi
Mainly spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan, Farsi is actually Persian, a direct descendant of Old Persian. Modern Persian first appeared circa 800 CE. Farsi speakers could quite easily read ancient texts in Persian with relative ease, more fluently than English speakers can read Shakespeare!

Ones you wouldn’t consider ancient

Icelandic
The Scandinavian language Icelandic is an Indo-European language from the North Germanic branch. This ancient language of the Norse peoples developed quite conservatively over the centuries. Amazingly, Icelanders can read their ancient sagas as if they were written yesterday.
Macedonian
This Slavic language belongs to the same family as Russian, Polish, Czech and Croatian. The Slavic language family is relatively young as far as languages are concerned and only split from Proto-Slavic, pre-ninth century CE.
Basque
The Basque language is a linguistic mystery. Spoken in regions that stretch across both France and Spain; it’s also unrelated to the Romance language family. The only explanation to explain it thus far, is that it existed long before the Romans arrived with the Latin they had spoken that subsequently developed into French and Spanish.
Finnish
The Finnish language is a member of the Finno-Ugric family which includes Estonian, Hungarian and several languages in minority groups across Siberia. Written down in the 16th century, its history is long. Interestingly, Finnish has many loanwords still in usage from Old Germanic and Gothic (those two languages do not exist today).
Georgian
Georgian is spoken in Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, originating from the Caucasus region, the frontier between Europe and Asia. It’s part of the Kartvelian language family and unlike any other in the world. Although its alphabet is thought to be adapted from Aramaic.

Last but not least

Irish Gaelic
A minority of people in Ireland speak Irish (Gaeilge) today, but its history is long and artistic. A member of the Celtic branch of Indo-European languages, it existed long before the Germanic influences of Norse, Anglo-Saxon and Frisian landed on the British Isles. Scottish Gaelic and Manx derived from Irish Gaelic through migration. With the oldest vernacular of any language in Western Europe, the ancient Irish chose to write their manuscripts in Gaelic rather than the common Latin, at that time.
Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation

Source: The Culture Trip

Four Courts, Dublin

Not translating into Irish could see legal cases dismissed

Four Courts, Dublin, not translating into irish could see legal cases dismissed
Image: Four Courts, Dublin / Wikipedia

Key legislation remains in English only

It was reported in The Journal today that criminal cases across the country could be adjourned or even dismissed as a result of the state’s failure to have 11-year-old legislation translated into Irish.

Solicitor, Samantha Geraghty, speaking on RTÉ Radio na Gaeltachta said the government has failed in its constitutional obligation to translate the Civil Liability and Courts Act 2004. Summonses are issued because of this piece of legislation. A judge from Belmullet district court, Mayo said that of such a breach “an order of prohibition could apply to appropriate cases.” Simply put, if a translation of the Act is not produced by 21st of March 2016, then there is a danger that some cases may be thrown out.

There is a constitutional right to have your case defended in Irish without disadvantage and that can’t happen if the law is not available in Irish,” Samantha Geraghty added.

According to a spokesperson from the Oireachtas, the Act is currently being translated into Irish and will be available shortly.

Source: The Journal

The STAR Team

What is a googol?

World’s Largest Named Number

What is a googol?

World’s Largest Named Number: Googol

Sometime in the 1930s, an American mathematician, Edward Kasner, was walking his nephews along the New Jersey Palisades when he asked them to help him name a particularly long number in an effort to pique their interest in mathematics. One nephew, nine-year-old Milton suggested “googol”. But it wasn’t until 1940 that the word was first introduced in a non-technical publication surveying the field of mathematics: Mathematics and the Imagination.

A googol is one followed by a hundred zeros or as follows.

1.0 x 10100

Milton also suggested googolplex; larger than a googol, “but still finite” as Kasner was quick to remark.

Google

Yes, the Internet search giant falls into place here. It is known that the name Google came from a misspelling of googol. Googleplex, the headquarters of Google in California is similarly derived from googolplex!

Googolplex can be written as follows:

10 x 10googol or 10(10100)

To put it into perspective, a googol is 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.

Source: Googolplexian.com

Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation
UFC Logo

Conor McGregor UFC Win, Lost in Translation

UFC Logo, Conor McGregor UFC Win, Lost in Translation

Conor McGregor UFC Win

Immediately after being knocked out within 13 seconds of the UFC 194’s main event, José Aldo’s comments post-fight were met with booing from the packed MGM Grand arena in Las Vegas.

Being a Brazilian national, an interpreter was brought in to translate Aldo’s remarks on the fight. The former champion was quoted

We need a rematch, it was not a fight.

The interviewer at the fight — a stand-up comedian — Joe Rogan took to Twitter to apologise for the confusion and the mistranslation of Aldo’s words. Many people did wonder however, how could Aldo’s long speech post-match [in Portuguese] be easily translated into only nine words!

The Real Translation

A Portuguese-speaking Reddit user, RandyLiddell translated what he heard José Aldo say…

Rogan: How much, if anything, of the fight can you remember?
Aldo: He threw a jab on my chest, I was already expecting that. When I went to attack him he hit me with a good cross and there is where he got me. I believe that after this fight we have to go for a rematch, is not done yet. He got me with a good shot and was able to finish the fight.

Rogan: How much did all the taunting affected you?
Aldo: It didn’t affect me in anything. Whatever he said it doesn’t matter, I don’t fall for provocations. My mind is always calm inside there, I try to just get in there and do my job. He was happy today, caught me with a good blow. I think we have to move on now and now I am waiting for a rematch, and God willing, next time I will be back much better trained and recover what is mine.

Perhaps the translator can be excused as it was a loud arena with little time to interpret everything Aldo had said.

Did you watch the fight?

The STAR Team

Source: Balls.ie

Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation
China flag, typo states resignation of China president Xi Jinping

Typo States Resignation of China President

China flag, typo states resignation of China president Xi Jinping

Inadvertent Typo States Resignation, Xi Jinping

The China News Service recently published an article about their president, Xi Jinping, saying that in his “resignation” that China and Africa had a shared destiny in their histories.

Xi Jinping was attending a China-Africa summit in Johannesburg, South Africa when the report was released. The typo led to the suspension of four journalists: one of whom is the news agency’s bureau chief in South Africa.

The editors of China News Service, which is state-owned, had mixed up the Mandarin words for speech (zhi ci) with resignation (ci zhi).

The mistake went unnoticed even before subsequently being printed. It was corrected by several other news channels online, but the edition was already in circulation. The typo ended up in other news stories before China News Service corrected the error.

Despite the suspension of the four journalists involved, it has been reported that although it was a “serious blunder”, it will not end their careers. However, the severity of their punishment is not yet clear.

Graham O'Mahony, Blogger and Web Designer
Graham
Web Designer and Blogger
The STAR Team
Follow the conversation on Twitter logo @STARTranslation

Source: The Guardian

Vote Now, STAR Christmas Mascot

Vote for STAR Christmas Mascot

Vote Now, STAR Christmas Mascot

Vote for your favourite Christmas Character / STAR Translation Imaging

STAR Christmas Mascot 2015

Which STAR Christmas Character is your favourite? Fox, Snowman, Santa Claus, Seal, Robin, Panda, Mouse, Gingerbread Man, Reindeer, Penguin or Hedgehog.

Cast your vote by clicking LIKE on your favourite one! There are eleven of these super cute characters. Which one should be our Christmas mascot for 2015?

Follow our Facebook tag: #STARChristmasMascot

Graham,
The STAR Team